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Discussion Starter #1
So I was riding all around the city today and I’m note this (I’m new to riding). So as I was riding I would release the clutch a lot and it turns off. I was wondering what the outcomes of that would be. Long term and short term. And also what are the outcomes if I don’t change my gears? Another issue I had was figuring out how to put my bike into neutral! It turned off and I couldn’t start it! But just recently before I got home right now, it turned off and I turned it on again but it wasn’t on neutral. I was wondering what the outcome of that can be and what I would need to look out for?
 

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Not sure I understand,, Release the clutch lever/handle thus engaging the clutch plates or Releasing clutch plates from powering transmission by pulling on clutch lever/handle..

By turns off I'll assume you mean engine quits suddenly in middle of road as tho it was turned off..

Makes me think your problem is in the CDI safety grounding circuit.. first thought is the side stand switch is breaking ground contact from road vibrations killing the engine spark and the clutch lever switch isn't always making grounding contact..

my Suzuki had a finicky clutch lever switch, sometimes I had to pull clutch handle multiple times before micro switch would make grounding contact and engine would start...
 

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What year is your bike? Have you taken basic rider training? Any chance you are killing the engine by letting out the clutch lever too rapidly?
 

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I'm with flightcontrol, releasing your clutch to quick, in a high gear (like 5th) would stall you out, and shut you down.
Clutching a bike by feathering in conjunction with feathering throttle, is how you should corner in tight spots at very low speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Taking my CHP training course soon I’m looking forward to getting taught by such experienced drivers. But I haven’t I still have ways to go on learning. Another question. When I started up my bike and tried to switch the gear it would turn off. Why is that? Do I have to let it warmup? I heard warning it up too much was bad. (For the oil)
What year is your bike? Have you taken basic rider training? Any chance you are killing the engine by letting out the clutch lever too rapidly?
 

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Taking my CHP training course soon I’m looking forward to getting taught by such experienced drivers. But I haven’t I still have ways to go on learning. Another question. When I started up my bike and tried to switch the gear it would turn off. Why is that? Do I have to let it warmup? I heard warning it up too much was bad. (For the oil)

Did you raise the kickstand before putting it in gear? How much choke are you using when starting the engine?

I suggest you park the bike until you have completed the CHP training course. The course will go more smoothly for you if you don’t have to unlearn bad habits.

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did you raise the kickstand before putting it in gear? How much choke are you using when starting the engine?

The first generation rebels (1985-87), do not have a sidestand safety switch like the second generation (1996-2016) models. That's why i asked what model year your bike is. Putting that info in your signature lets others help you. See my signature for how to.

i suggest you park the bike until you have completed the chp training course. The course will go more smoothly for you if you don’t have to unlearn bad habits.

Sound advice. Wish I had known this before taking my rider training as I taught myself some bad habits that have been very hard to unlearn.
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mmmmm
 

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dt - It sounds like you are not revving the engine before slipping the clutch. It must be revved, but not that much. Engine stalling is more based on your left hand than your right. Meaning clutch control more than throttle (in my opinion). I'm going to describe my take on clutch control, and is the way I quickly taught my son to control his clutch on his CR 85R.

A lot of the following is based on being comfortable with the clutch. Not just something anyone with no experience can do. I suggest you try this in a clear area not around other cars.

With the engine running, pull the clutch lever, push the shifter down into first gear. Without even revving, ease the clutch out until you first feel it start to "slip / engage / pull." Don't worry, what can happen at this point? It can stall, but you got your feet down so it shouldn't move much and your legs would stop it from falling over. Let's say that at the point where you feel it begin the slip / engage / pull is at a clutch lever position of say 50%. At the 50% point, you'll want to rev, just a little, not much. You may need to rev a little up and down, but a steady rev is better, yet it takes some practice. Once revved, ease the clutch out a bit more to say oh maybe 60% lever release (these numbers are just guesstimates, but is a relevant way to think about this).

Once at say 60% clutch lever release, the bike should start rolling, hold the clutch lever at this 60% release point while the bike begins to roll and gain some speed. This is where mistakes happen for new riders. At the point the bike starts to roll, they want to completely release the clutch. But, just hold the 60% or so and let the bike gain some speed. This is the clutch slipping process. Once the bike is rolling somewhat, there is a speed at which the clutch lever can just be slammed out (I'm not condoning doing that, this is just for explanation), and there would be no feel, the bike would not jump or shake. That speed is the speed where the engine and the transmission are spinning at the same speed. Back to the 60% position ... once rolling a good bit (which is about the speed you'll be lifting your feet), ease the clutch the rest of the way out. All this done at a steady throttle position if possible. All this can be done in maybe 2 or 3 seconds once good at it.

This is not bragging, this is explaining how someone with experience can be easy on a clutch. I can do this process and have my clutch fully engaged at about the point where my rear tire is at the location where my front tire was when stopped. Very low revving. I'll see if I can take a video of this. I learned a clutch like this because I have a Dodge diesel truck with a 6 speed manual. But I've had manual transmission from day 1 of my driving career. Luckily 1st gear in my Dodge is a creeper. I have hauled some very heavy trailers. And if one doesn't use a clutch properly, one can burn a clutch out very quickly. The key is to get the clutch fully engaged as smoothly and over as short a distance as possible, and then once fully engaged, then accelerate. Let the fully engaged clutch do the work, not a slipping clutch. A slipping clutch is only good to get a vehicle rolling. A fully engaged clutch does the work.
 

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Did you raise the kickstand before putting it in gear? How much choke are you using when starting the engine?

I suggest you park the bike until you have completed the CHP training course. The course will go more smoothly for you if you don’t have to unlearn bad habits.

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P.S. I had remembered from his/her introductory post that the OP rides a 2009 Rebel.

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