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85 CMX 250C, 82 GW Remember that you are invisible, treat all others accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
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Honda engineers have reasons for all that they do. Some we agree with, some that we don't. This one makes a lot of sense.
I've heard that it's in case the chain comes off, that it doesn't get caught in the bolts for the sprocket, bind, & bring the bike to a sudden uncontrolled stop.
Only stupid question is 1 not asked!
 
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I've heard that it's in case the chain comes off, that it doesn't get caught in the bolts for the sprocket, bind, & bring the bike to a sudden uncontrolled stop.
This sounds good, but I've noticed that replacement sprockets don't have it. Would it be particularly difficult to swap it over?
Im sure this an "issue" that can fixed with just simple periodic maintenance, but perhaps it would just be for some extra peace of mind.
 

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To swap it, the rivets holding the flange on would need to be drilled out, and new holes drilled into the sprocket if the flange holes don't match the existing holes.
 

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85 CMX 250C, 82 GW Remember that you are invisible, treat all others accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
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I've never put it on any of my new sprockets. If you make sure to maintain your chain, and make sure that your chain is the proper tightness you should never have to worry about it.
I think they did it to make it "idiot proof".o_O We all know who we are.o_O🙃😋 I've made as many dumb mistakes as the next person. I did keep it just in case though!
It does a lot of good setting in my barn! LOL
 

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05 Honda CMX250C | 93 Kawi VN750
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I was going to say that maybe it's a spacer, but there's already two of them on the rear hub, so... 🤷‍♂️

I had no idea this existed, though, never saw my Rebel's OEM rear sprocket. I've gotten into the habit of safety wiring just about everything that worried me about falling off. Previous owner was not kind to my Rebel.

20,000 miles later and no plans to sell her, this Rebel is going to have a happy rest of life!
 

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85 CMX 250C, 82 GW Remember that you are invisible, treat all others accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
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Ditto! Until we can't, we keep the Rebels!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Thanks guys, chain catcher makes sense.

I never seen another bike with it, so when I get bored one of these days, I'll probably remove it and hopefully save a pound of un-sprung rotational weight. Or maybe just buy that 30T sprocket off amazon to stretch out the gearing.
 

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85 CMX 250C, 82 GW Remember that you are invisible, treat all others accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
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My man! What year is your Rebel? It isn't stated in your signature.
It has been noted by a few of us, that the 1985-87 (1st gen), seem to be able to handle the 15t front, 30t rear sprockets better than the 2nd gen.
I still am quite able to travel at highway speeds, even riding 2 up, with this setup. However, many others cannot.
Just be ready to change back if it doesn't work for you. The front is much easier to change than the rear though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My man! What year is your Rebel? It isn't stated in your signature.
It has been noted by a few of us, that the 1985-87 (1st gen), seem to be able to handle the 15t front, 30t rear sprockets better than the 2nd gen.
I still am quite able to travel at highway speeds, even riding 2 up, with this setup. However, many others cannot.
Just be ready to change back if it doesn't work for you. The front is much easier to change than the rear though.
I got a 2012, 15T already on there. I also added a shim to the needle and +1 on the main jet, which I think should make it similar to the first gen. It was definitely noticeable and the roll-off surge went away. It's pretty comfortable on highway around 70-75mph (unless there is a stiff headwind). That being said, I don't ride much highway. I just commute on an expressway with ~45 mph speed limit. I got a Kawasaki Elminator ZL600 for highway riding.

I really just want to swap the sprocket to save the weight 😁. Probably can't tell, but it's the fun of modding and the weight weenie in me. And for $20, cheap experiment.

I'm also itching to shift the spark pickup around to advance the timing by the elusive 4 degree. I'll probably get to it this fall. It's really hard to find information on this, so I'll post a how-to posting to refresh the knowledge base.
 

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85 CMX 250C, 82 GW Remember that you are invisible, treat all others accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
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There are adjustable timing AC CDIs available on the web. I've seen a few. I was always a little too nervous to try them.
How much did your economy change with the rejetting?
If you look at my mods, you'll see that getting rid of weight on the bike is not an issue with me. 🥴 I ride with comfort in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I could be wrong, but I think Honda just went down a jet size on the gen2. Upping the jet essentially turns it into a gen1. Also, I was just correcting the lean condition at half to full throttle. Shouldn't affect mpg, unless of course you use the slightly more power to ride at a slightly faster speed.

As for adjustable CDI, I wouldn't trust any of the cheap ones with that janky looking poteniometer on the side because I don't think is has an rpm-based advancing curve. A straight 4-degree advance across the curve is good enough for me, and that can be done by shifting the pickup around.

That being said, it would be fun to order a standalone Arduino based ECU called the speeduino (around $100) and program a speed x load ignition map and tuning it with a knock sensor. I would totally do if I was still in college. Great job interview discussion topic.
 

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Some kind of damper? Looks nice? Adds weight for some reason?
I couldn't tell you the why but it's definitely not a damper. There would have to be a viscoelastic material between the cage and the sprocket ring or a between the sprocket ring and another concentric ring, like there is in a harmonic balancer for a car. For damping, there must be a viscous (like oil in the forks) or visco-elastic material some sort of rubber to absorb the energy.
Extra mass can be used to tune the damping system but mass alone cannot produce damping.
This one makes a lot of sense.
I've heard that it's in case the chain comes off, that it doesn't get caught in the bolts for the sprocket, bind, & bring the bike to a sudden uncontrolled stop.
Only stupid question is 1 not asked!
Nice to know that. Thanks Emil.
 
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