Honda Rebel Forum banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,126 Posts
You can change the sprocket ratio but speed gains will be minimal at best. The main reason people change their sprockets is to lower the rpm at hwy speed and to make 1st and 2nd gear more usable instead of having to shift so quick. Some people say they gain maybe 4 or 5 mph on top end depending on what ratio they choose but I can't confirm that.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,853 Posts
I use a 14-front 30 rear gear set n works well. :thumb:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,126 Posts
You can significantly lower your rpm by putting a 15 tooth front sprocket on or you can put a 30 tooth rear sprocket on and lower it even more. I have a 15t on front and 32t on the rear, that's about the same ratio as just using a 30t on the rear. I have been very pleased with the results.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,853 Posts
ebay is easiest place to get them:thumb:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,126 Posts
I bought mine on eBay but there are several places to buy them online like cheapcycleparts.com or bikebandit.com. JT is the brand sprockets I bought and the quality is pretty good.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
66 Posts
I run a 15/30. Some call this 'too much.' I like it. Yeah, I'm slow. But I'm not in a hurry, either. Most every car on the road pulls away from a red light faster than I can. Minivans outpace me without even trying. But I don't care. I cut my RPMs WAY down, and my fuel economy is stupid good. I've gotten over 80mpg, and I wasn't really trying. I never ride on the interstate, either. If there is a back road, I'll find it and enjoy it a lot more. I could take 2 miles to get up to 55. Relax. Life is a race; he who finishes first is DEAD.

Mine are also JT. Used them on my much faster Ninja 250 for over a decade. I did a much more extreme (way too much) ratio change on that bike. But, it had nearly twice the oomph, too... Apples and oranges really. Just demonstrating that it's doable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,771 Posts
Part of why its too much is the alternator output. The alternator does not hit full output until 5000 rpm. Dropping the ratio too far, combined with short shifting, means less generated electricity. That may work for folks with long runs or limited stops/turns on their route but enough folks short shift and are having issues with their batteries because of it as it is.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
66 Posts
Part of why its too much is the alternator output. The alternator does not hit full output until 5000 rpm. Dropping the ratio too far, combined with short shifting, means less generated electricity. That may work for folks with long runs or limited stops/turns on their route but enough folks short shift and are having issues with their batteries because of it as it is.
Excellent point. I never make short runs, or long runs at low speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
Use either a 15 front or a 30 rear. If you use both it stresses the motor too much.
The cheapest plan would be try a 15 tooth up front and see how you like it. If it's not enough get a 30 tooth rear gear and try it with the stock 14 tooth up front. If that's still not enough (unlikely) go with both of them.
Personally I got tired of having to downshift to 4th gear every time I hit a slight incline with the 14/30 setup. The 15/33 was a nice improvement and should have been the stock gearset.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
66 Posts
Personally I got tired of having to downshift to 4th gear every time I hit a slight incline with the 14/30 setup.
So I slow down a little bit... So? Why you in such a hurry? :p I live in a generally flat area so it doesn't affect me much. If you know the route, you get a little speed up for inertia before hitting the hill. I don't play in traffic much, nor do I see speed limits as a necessary goal I must maintain. So I get where I'm going 2 minutes later, so what? Wanna race me to the red light, too?

Not trying to rag on you, just pointing out that many people see things as 'needed' that are not needed at all... I'm considering 15/29 or 15/28. 1st Gear is still useless. I short shift, but I get up to 60 eventually, and roll that speed for 20+ miles straight. If I find myself driving in the city, well, that's just gross and I don't do it. :p

The Ninja 250 has higher compression and gets even better fuel economy, while making nearly twice the output numbers. For people who just gotta go, go, go it may be the better choice. Had mine deep in triple digit speed many times with stupid-long sprockets and a giant rear tire. Same price tag, water-cooled, same parts availability... I suggest that people who find 15/30 on the Rebel unacceptably slow are riding the wrong bike. But, that's just my opinion.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,771 Posts
bB2NER is in Tennessee. Pretty hilly country. The Rebel was set up with the national 55 speed limit in mind but is also designed as a total system. A few may be able to radically depart on the final drive gearing from the original total system but for most its best not to depart that much.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,771 Posts
That's the thing. That much of a change is a bad idea for most. A select few can do it but for most, it isn't the best choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
I agree with bB2ner, try the 15 up front first. Easy to do and if you find that it's not enough then you can change the back sprocket. 15 works good for me, lots of hills where I am and I live at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains so I ride the Parkway a lot. And in a hurry? Damn right I am....I'm the Pinto Racer ain't I? lol :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,578 Posts
I enjoy a leisurely ride too, But I like to have some Oomph on tap if I feel the need to use it. For anyone who is considering altering ratios, the simplest switch is the 15 T on the front. If you don't like the results, switching back is a half-hour deal. If you like it but want more, at least you'll know how such alterations affect the performance of the bike before you proceed. Anything on the rear wheel requires lifting the rear end, and may require cutting the drive chain. Lots more involved for an experiment, and if you cut a link or two out of your chain, there's that to deal with as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
FULL DISCLOSURE: I sell PBI sprockets and Rebel Gears sprockets. Also, Honda Rebel compatible gas tanks, fairings, ignition, gas cap, helmet lock, fork lock, saddlebags/trunks, etc. on ebay, plus other stuff. I thought I would mention that so someone doesn't say "Hey, you sell those so maybe you are biased and just trying to sell more". I sell a lot of other non-motorcycle related stuff too, but I do sell the sprockets and I just wanted to be upfront with everyone, since this is a thread on sprockets. I have a passion for motorcycles and the rebel was my first bike. I also like working out of my house and selling stuff, so it's kind of a good mix for me.

Before I started selling sprockets, I read quite a bit of Soul Searchers' posts on the rebels performance numbers with a tach on this forum and the other rebel forum and that got me thinking about possibilities. I liked learning about how the performance changed, positively in my view, although Jeff is absolutely right, there is no free lunch and some torque is lost.

I started with the 15t, which is what I would recommend for anyone. It is so easy to do. I takes about an hour I guess and is reversible if you decide to go back to stock.

She rode with the 15t for about 2 1/2 years and I wanted to see what the 15/30 was like.

Wow! All I can say is....WOW! It REALLY changes the bike into a different bike. The 15/30 combo rocks!

You can go to gearingcommander.com and plug in the numbers, it's kind of fun too. The 15 tooth drops your rpms by 6%, not a lot, but it definitely makes it nicer.
Go to the gearingcommander site, plug in the 15/30 combo and drop down to
RPM differences due to drive train setup changes:
At 50mph/5th gear your engine is turning 822 rpms slower than stock.
At 60mph/5th gear your engine is turning 986 rpms slower than stock.
At 70mph/5th gear your engine is turning 1150 rpms slower than stock.

So, it is much calmer at cruise.

But...I live in hilly eastern Nebraska, not mountainous Tennessee, kinda wished I did though. We do get some stiff, steady winds from time to time. So yeah, you may have to downshift, it just depends on your terrain, load, wind, etc. Overall, the riding experience is a good one.

For me, when riding her rebel, I don't notice the slowness at a stoplight, described above. I was kinda surprised to read that. My starts at stoplights are just fine, in fact, better. I am always able to pull away from cars when the light changes to green. I get pretty far ahead of them, easily. I like staying ahead/away from traffic. It's a safety thing for me. I wouldn't like it for my wifes' bike to have a huge negative performance with some some mod I did. With that said, she doesn't drive super fast either.

What's better is that 1st, 2nd and 3rd are so much taller. I go all the way through the intersection before having to shift to second, whereas before I had to shift within the intersection.

The vibes are dramatically reduced at cruise. That may or may not be a factor for you, but it was for me and for my wife. Your hands don't get all tingly and numb after riding for an hour or two. Before they did, at least some times.

Engine/Chain wear is reduced with lower RPM's. MPG is improved, especially at cruise.

I just don't understand how it would stress the engine. Can someone explain that to me? When starting from standstill, I automatically give it throttle, just before letting the clutch out. Similarly, when shifting between gears. I never lug the engine and have coached my wife not to as well.

I still haven't gotten around to gettin the tachometer on it. My son in college got a Ninja 250, which is up on the lift now getting worked on. I pulled off all the fairing and I'm sanding and painting it. I'll probably stick some LED strips on it for him and I have been thinking about upgrading his headlight to an HID from DDM Tuning. So it may be awhile. But the tach would be really helpful to have on the Rebel.

The bike always gets plugged into the battery tender whenever it is at the house. I have a battery tender for each bike. The batteries seem to last a lot longer that way. So the battery performance hasn't changed at all for me with the 15/30.

There is no chain cutting with the 30 tooth or the 15/30 combo. When you go lower, 29, 28, or 27 you have to take out a couple links. A masterlink runs $5 to $10 and it involves a using a dremel to get the old masterlink off. You will need a C-clamp, a needlenose pliars, socket set, torque wrench and a mallet.

I didn't have to lift the back of my bike and I didn't have to remove my rear wheel when I did my rear sprocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
When I'm on a 2 lane 55mph zone and have traffic behind me I like to be able to give some throttle and maintain about 60 and not get passed while going up slight inclines. With the 30 tooth rear gear I always had to downshift or loose about 5 mph but not so much with the 15 front 33 rear set.
It would even sometimes loose speed heading into high wind gusts or just passing an oncoming big truck. Stock gearing and just the 15 tooth front gear allows me to use only throttle to keep my speed the same.

To me if you are in high gear trying to maintain speed and the throttle does nothing unless you downshift the engine is being stressed. Sort of like a higher RPM lugging.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top