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2016 Honda Rebel 250
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently purchased a 2016 Honda Rebel 250 with 3,400 miles on it and I have riding the bike a TON! I've only had the bike for about a month and put around 700 miles on it and with me riding it that much things are starting to come to my attention with the bikes performance and I'm wandering if maybe I'm not riding it correctly or if I need to do any kind of maintenance? I read about people down shifting but when im riding and need to come to a stop or just slow down for a turn or anything else I just pull in the clutch and shift it all the way down and depending on the speed I'm at when i take off again I just shift to that gear and continue is that going to wear out or mess up my clutch faster? I've noticed a clunking like sound when I go all the way down to first and up to second. Also when shifting I hit the last gear at 40 mph and ride that gear from 45 all the way up to 75 it seems like my bike goes through the gears really fast I'm just wandering if there's any adjustments I need to make or anything I should check to fix.
Thanks for helping!
 

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Have you taken a basic rider course such as those offered by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation in almost all states? It will make those who take it safer, more accomplished riders. My instructor recommend keeping the bike in the speed/gear range that will allow the rider to accelerate quickly as needed. Downshifting all the way to first when that doesn't match the bike's speed will do several things. First, it will cause that "clunk" you are hearing. Don't believe that is good for the transmission. Second, it will drastically reduce the bike's speed if the clutch is let off and increase the time needed to match the correct gear with the bike's speed.

If you look at the speedometer, you will see red numbered arrows. Each one represents the maximum speed for that particular gear. Because the engine is designed to rev high without damaging it, riders unfamiliar with the Rebel think they need to upshift sooner than may be necessary. A lot has to do with acceleration. If quick acceleration is needed, leave the engine in a lower gear longer than if you are cruising along at 35 mph. With experience, you can match speed and gear without consciously thinking about it. I ride in relatively flat terrain, and usually shift to fifth around 35 mph. In an area with hills, that speed increases.
 

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2016 Honda Rebel 250
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Oh okay I thought it reving up that high was not good at all! So for the best results I should be shifting a little before the maximum mark at each gear and not shifting all the way down and into neutral on the highway to coast and shifting up to the gear I need and keep going? Also I've been developing a bad habit of when I'm shifting gears instead of pulling the clutch all the way in to feel the click on the shifter pedal then slowly letting out the clutch while I'm giving it gas I just accelerate through the gears engaging the clutch and hitting the shifter almost at the same time barely even letting off the gas I'm just wondering if that's bad for the bike to be screaming through the gears like that with those quick shifts and if I need to take my time shifting and take that pause to make sure the shifter clicks all the way and take my time letting out the clutch and giving it gas into the next gear.
 

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I let the engine sound guide me as to when to shift. Waiting until the bike gets close to the maximum speed for each gear isn't necessary unless climbing a very steep grade, is terrible on fuel economy and hard on the ears. It's extremely rare that I even get close to those shift points. On level road, I'm in fifth gear by 35 mph.

My shifting procedure is to simultaneously pull clutch lever and let off the gas, then quickly shift, release lever, and get back on the throttle. With experience, it takes less than a second. Letting the bike slow and gradually engaging/disengaging the clutch will result in jerky shifts. The Rebel can be shifted without using the clutch if the speed is correct, but I don't recommended it except for emergencies.

Your questions, and the fact you didn't say you have been professionally trained makes me wonder if you are teaching yourself to ride. Riders that are friend/family/self taught have more crashes than trained riders, and when trained riders crash, their injuries are less severe. Getting professional training is the best gift a rider can give himself and those who care about them.
 
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