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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everybody
I have a 1999 honda rebel 250. i realized that when I removed the linkage with the small arm that connects to the shaft so I could remove the small sprocket cover and reinstalled it back, i noticed that I could no longer shift into 1st or 2nd and when I did manage to make it change gear, it would be a pain to put it back into neutral. I've read the forum and stumbled upon a post with this image. I can't remember who posted it to give proper credit. however, my dilemma is with measuring these angles as trying to shove a protractor up in there to make an accurate angle measurement or trying to make a small little rig to read both angles simultaneously proves too inconvenient. what I was wondering is whether i could make a meaningful and accurate adjustment by using a rod length measurement instead of measuring the angles?

thank you for your time reading this post.
 

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It doesn't have to be within seconds of arc to work - try doing it by eye. And don't forget to lube up all the pieces that seem to want to be lubed in that assembly.
 

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Look for some small indentations in the shaft and clamp. Getting those to line up should do the trick. In the future, use a marker to place an X over the shaft and clamp. Makes reassembly very easy.
 

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thank you for replying. thats the weird part. the clamp is properly aligned with the spline shaft. i can tell because the two indentation marks are right on top of each other. but when i try to shift. it feels like its not enough movement to make that click that tells me a gear change happened. i feel as though i might have to adjust the overall length of the linkage rod to get the shifter at the correct angle or height so i can shift. ive search the repair and owners manual but such information is hard to come by.
 

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It doesn't have to be within seconds of arc to work - try doing it by eye. And don't forget to lube up all the pieces that seem to want to be lubed in that assembly.
thank you for replying. how off can i be if i went this route?
 

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You shouldn't be too far off. To answer your original question, from nut to nut on my bike it's a little less than 130mm. Did you lubricate the linkage, including the roller bearing in the left rear side cover?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You shouldn't be too far off. To answer your original question, from nut to nut on my bike it's a little less than 130mm. Did you lubricate the linkage, including the roller bearing in the left rear side cover?
thank you. I will admit that I cleaned our the cover with degreaser and carb cleaner before I noticed a roller bearing. I didn't spray there directly but it could have had some effect. what kind of lubricant should I use? regular wheel bearing grease? the two linkages that are hidden under the rubber boots have not been lubricated. I wasn't even aware that they should be lubricated. it's my first time working on a bike. I'm used to working on cars.
 

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Wheel bearing grease is what I use. Clean and lube under the boots, the shifter pivot bolt (#15 in the diagram below) and the roller bearing. There is a groove on the pivot bolt especially for holding grease. The acorn nut, number eighteen, is just a jam nut. Snug it down, but don't over tighten it. I like to use a drop of blue threadlocker to help keep it in place. https://www.cheapcycleparts.com/oemparts/a/hon/506be7cff870023420a28fdb/pedal

You'll be surprised what a difference lubrication will make.
 

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And just in the interest of correct nomenclature.... That bearing in the sprocket cover is called a needle bearing (because the "rollers" are very small diameter like needles) Roller bearing means something totally different.
 

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... the clamp is properly aligned with the spline shaft. i can tell because the two indentation marks are right on top of each other. ....
If the alignment marks are aligned, and the pivot is lubed, you have some lee-way, start with eye-ball good enough to parallel.
Mine had a very short PO, the rod was lengthened considerably to account for short legs and it worked fine for them, I did have to adjust it back down to an angle comfortable for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
interestingly enough, this may have been to my own stupid error but it shifts great with the bike on. all this time i have been trying to do it with the bike off. ive taken the bike on a test run and encountered an odd situation where the bike fakes going into 2nd but stays in neutral instead.
 

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interestingly enough, this may have been to my own stupid error but it shifts great with the bike on. all this time i have been trying to do it with the bike off. ive taken the bike on a test run and encountered an odd situation where the bike fakes going into 2nd but stays in neutral instead.

Same here, the bike once in a while stops at N when I'm trying to up-click to 2nd, and I attribute it to my operator error and possibly needing to adjust the shift lever a tad more. I had to change PO's short-leg-almost-verticle-lever position.


When the engine is off, the dogteeth can be in complete disalignment and you can't really shift anything because the drum can't complete its rotation to the next detent-stop until the dogteeth engage. When running there is some vibration and trace amount of torque from fluidic friction in the open clutch to allow the dogteeth to wiggle into place.
 

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ive taken the bike on a test run and encountered an odd situation where the bike fakes going into 2nd but stays in neutral instead.
This is almost always due to operator error in executing the shift. The lever needs to be pulled up firmly and deliberately all the way to the length of its travel until resistance is felt on the top of the foot. Beginners often try to shift too quickly and don't follow through to the end of the shifting motion. Its fine to still have the lever pulled all the way up when the clutch is released and the bike is operating in the selected gear. I like to feel that end of travel resistance in my boot for a fraction of a second on every shift.
 
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