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As most experienced riders know, many drivers aren't looking for motorcyclists, and therefore tend not to see them, even when they are close. This is especially true at night, when visibility and depth perception are reduced. A rider's headlight(s) can be mistaken for those on the car behind the rider. One way to increase a bike's conspicuity day or night, is to use the SMIDSY maneuver, aka The Weave. This is also helpful in avoiding having a cager turn in front of a rider. Drivers making left turns in front of motorcycles often lead to very serious injury or death of the rider.
Avoiding the SMIDSY! | Honda Rebel Forum

While I prefer not to ride at night, several times this week I did. Twice it involved close calls that could have turned into a crash or trip to the ER or morgue. The first occurred when I was in the right lane of a two lane roundabout. As I approached an entry/exit point on the roundabout, the driver in the far lane saw me and stopped (I had the right-of-way). A driver in the near lane approached the roundabout at a speed that led me to believe they didn't see me, and therefore was not going to stop/yield. I immediately got on the brakes and blew the (loud, aftermarket) horn. As I was in a curve, doing the SMIDSY wasn't an option. The car kept coming. More braking and horn blowing ensued, and about the time I got the bike stopped, the driver saw me, slammed on the brakes, and stopped part way into the lane I was in. The driver had a very surprised look on her face. I rode around her and made it home with no further issues.

Tonight, I approached a T intersection where traffic on the intersecting road to the right has to stop. There was a car at the intersection waiting for the traffic, which was going both ways, to clear. There was a vehicle behind me. I did the SMIDSY several times to alert the car ahead to my presence and also reduced throttle. When the last vehicle in the oncoming line of traffic cleared the intersection, I saw the tires of the stopped vehicle begin to rotate as it began a left turn. I immediately hit the brakes and horn. The car continued into the intersection. Fortunately, there was enough space between us that I could safely bring the bike to a stop. But not only did the driver turn in front of me, they turned into my lane and kept heading straight towards me! About the time I was planning to ride into the ditch to avoid a collision, they swerved into their lane.

Deer are common in many areas and pose a real threat to riders. When it begins to get dark, I will wait until a cage goes by and fall in a few seconds behind them. The cage "sweeps" deer off the road in front of me, minimizing the chances I will hit one. It's mating season for deer in this area, and deer can be active any time of day. Stay alert, and avoid tangling with Bambi.
 

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About the only thing that may help is a modulating headlamp, if they are legal where you live. I have found they are hard NOT to look at. However I don't think that would have been any benefit with your roundabout scenario.

Yesterday I rounded a bend to find the car in front at a dead stop in the middle of the road, looking at the deer in the trees.
This morning a truck rounded the bend I was approaching fully in the middle of the road, as we got closer (and the truck moved over to the side) I could see the driver with his hand in front of his face because the sun was in his eyes. He probably heard me as I went past the cab but I seriously doubt he saw me at all.

Stay safe out there everyone.
 

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You are correct about modulating headlight(s) - they really increase visibility. I ordered a pair of inexpensive mirror stem mounted LED headlights on ebay, and discovered if I turned the ignition on and off rapidly, they would modulate. They weren't advertised as modulating. So my routine is to start the bike and then modulate the headlights. I was doing this both day and night and once had the truck in front of me slow and then pull onto the shoulder to let me by. I assume he thought I was an emergency vehicle of some sort. Some time later, I was stopped by a policeman and told modulating white lights are illegal in Louisiana. Turns out he was partially right; federal law keeps all states from prohibiting modulating headlights, so long as they automatically no longer modulate when it's dark. So I don't modulate the headlights at night, but sure wish I could.

I would like to add that constantly being aware of what is going on around a rider, anticipating what others on the road may do, and reacting in a timely manner are key to safe riding. That's all covered in the MSF basic rider course, but bears repeating.
 

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Yes, awareness is absolutely key, it's why I don't listen to music, it not only occupies the mind at some level, but decreases the traffic noises that can sometimes key you into danger.

I installed some thumbnail sized spots either side of the front fender to light up the area right in front of the tire as my headlight is poor in that area. Well something about my soldering/wiring was off and they actually look like they are modulating most of the time. Not gonna fix that unless I have to!
 
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