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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This past weekend I installed new brake pads and a new front tire on my '02 Rebel. I learned from past threads that I should use EBC FA228 pads, the Dunlop D404 is a fine replacement for the stock rubber, and 100/90-18 will fit if that's all the local tire shop has.

My question: I'm a 50ish Type 1 diabetic and I don't have the hand strength I used to, and while I succeeded in mounting the front tire, it took about all the strength I could muster to get the new bead over the front wheel using Motion Pro irons. I have a 130/90-15 D404 ready to mount on the rear. Is it harder, easier, or about the same effort to mount the rear as the front? And if I opt to pull the rear wheel and have a local shop mount the tire, where do I turn in my man card?

Thanks!
 

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Because of the effort this entails, and many of my other repairs have gone the same route, I'm willing to pay the $50 charge to have the tire put on by a shop. Right now a shop is doing this near me for my front tire. We get older we get lazy and more frivolous at times when it comes to money it appears. :LOL:
 
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New tires are a lot easier for me to install than to remove the old ones. Lubricating the bead helps the tire slip on with less effort. Dish soap, WD-40 and commercial tire lubricant all work.

The last time I had a shop install a tire (2008) they charged only $10. If you decide to have a shop do it, phone around to compare prices.
 
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1986 rebel 2004 sportster
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This past weekend I installed new brake pads and a new front tire on my '02 Rebel. I learned from past threads that I should use EBC FA228 pads, the Dunlop D404 is a fine replacement for the stock rubber, and 100/90-18 will fit if that's all the local tire shop has.

My question: I'm a 50ish Type 1 diabetic and I don't have the hand strength I used to, and while I succeeded in mounting the front tire, it took about all the strength I could muster to get the new bead over the front wheel using Motion Pro irons. I have a 130/90-15 D404 ready to mount on the rear. Is it harder, easier, or about the same effort to mount the rear as the front? And if I opt to pull the rear wheel and have a local shop mount the tire, where do I turn in my man card?

Thanks!
I have never mounted my own tires so you are already way ahead of me :)
 

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This past weekend I installed new brake pads and a new front tire on my '02 Rebel. I learned from past threads that I should use EBC FA228 pads, the Dunlop D404 is a fine replacement for the stock rubber, and 100/90-18 will fit if that's all the local tire shop has.

My question: I'm a 50ish Type 1 diabetic and I don't have the hand strength I used to, and while I succeeded in mounting the front tire, it took about all the strength I could muster to get the new bead over the front wheel using Motion Pro irons. I have a 130/90-15 D404 ready to mount on the rear. Is it harder, easier, or about the same effort to mount the rear as the front? And if I opt to pull the rear wheel and have a local shop mount the tire, where do I turn in my man card?

Thanks!
I have faced issues similar to yours. I too am a long term diabetic and have issues with strength. My right shoulder is really bad. Sometimes even reaching out for a cup of coffee is painful. I am quite a bit older than you and always like to tell people that I survived 9 hour open heart surgery in the middle of the pandemic. This forum has been very very helpful. I am in physical therapy right now to get my shoulder more useful. Soon I will be back on my rebel. The challenges I faced and the hep provided in this forum is in the following thread.
Tire Changing Issues.
I tackled the rear tire first. I was able to remove the old tire off the rim with great difficulty, although I pinched the tube. After patching the tube, I was lble to put the new tire on but not without pinching the tube again. At that point I decided to have the trie mounted on the rim by a shop.

For dealing with the front tire tire, I bought Tire Mounting Bead Lubricant Lubricant. First I tried to mount the tire using sap and water, it was a challenge but it was really much easier with the tire lube. I fell I would have been able to mount the rear tire too had I had the wisdom to use the lube. If you plan to change tires in yourself in future too, you might want to buy the lube in bigger size. The tub showed in the picture might be just enough for two tires, definitely more than enough for one tire.

Good luck and happy rising.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The last time I had a shop install a tire (2008) they charged only $10. If you decide to have a shop do it, phone around to compare prices.
If I can find a shop that will do it for $10, I'll definitely do that! The shop where I bought the tires will install for $35 if I dismount the wheel and bring it to them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have faced issues similar to yours. I too am a long term diabetic and have issues with strength. My right shoulder is really bad. Sometimes even reaching out for a cup of coffee is painful. I am quite a bit older than you and always like to tell people that I survived 9 hour open heart surgery in the middle of the pandemic. This forum has been very very helpful. I am in physical therapy right now to get my shoulder more useful. Soon I will be back on my rebel. The challenges I faced and the hep provided in this forum is in the following thread.
Tire Changing Issues.
I tackled the rear tire first. I was able to remove the old tire off the rim with great difficulty, although I pinched the tube. After patching the tube, I was lble to put the new tire on but not without pinching the tube again. At that point I decided to have the trie mounted on the rim by a shop.

For dealing with the front tire tire, I bought Tire Mounting Bead Lubricant Lubricant. First I tried to mount the tire using sap and water, it was a challenge but it was really much easier with the tire lube. I fell I would have been able to mount the rear tire too had I had the wisdom to use the lube. If you plan to change tires in yourself in future too, you might want to buy the lube in bigger size. The tub showed in the picture might be just enough for two tires, definitely more than enough for one tire.

Good luck and happy rising.
Lots of good info in that thread - I didn't see it when I searched before. "Frozen shoulder" is pretty common for T1Ds like us. My doc recommended range-of-motion exercises where you hold a soup can or a light dumbbell in each hand and raise your hand to the front, to the side, to the back, etc.

I feel stupid after I see your link to NAPA bead lube for $3! I bought this stuff called Bead Don off Amazon for $24. Seems like it's made for tubeless tires where the bead seal must be airtight. Live and learn, I guess.
 

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New tires are a lot easier for me to install than to remove the old ones. Lubricating the bead helps the tire slip on with less effort. Dish soap, WD-40 and commercial tire lubricant all work.

The last time I had a shop install a tire (2008) they charged only $10. If you decide to have a shop do it, phone around to compare prices.
I should have mentioned that price was for a tire and rim I had removed from the bike and carried to the shop. Would definitely have been more if it was still on the bike.
 

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My area, it's $50 if you bring in the tire & the wheel off the bike. They charge 45 minutes work time.
 

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I have a shop not too far from me that charges about $10 to mount and balance a tire IF you buy the tire from them. Otherwise it is about $50. They can order whatever tire you want. I have always done my own tires. Having the right tools and using the right methods makes all the difference. The rear tire on a Rebel is harder than the front tire because it is wider and smaller in diameter. I have three Motion Pro 14.5 tire spoons, and use Beadbuster tire mounting lube Tire Mounting Lube | Tire Bead Lubricant | BeadBuster (soapy water will rust and corrode the rim) and use Tire Talc ( Rema Tire Talc: 16.0oz Canister | - Ben’s Cycle | Milwaukee Bicycle Shop: Bikes, Frames, & Parts ) on both the tube and inside the tire. I always use new rim strips. I use large C clamps to break the bead if necessary. Once I get the bead broken in one spot, I start spraying Windex between the tire and rim. It makes getting the rest of the bead off easier, and is non corrosive. Getting the valve stem through the hole in the rim with one bead installed can be an issue. I use a Tusk valve stem puller Tusk Valve Stem Puller | Parts & Accessories | Rocky Mountain ATV/MC (rockymountainatvmc.com) which makes it a lot easier. Remember tire beads do not stretch. When I first start putting the bead over the rim, I stick a 3" wide piece of 1" thick wood between the rim and tire bead to force the bead down into the deep part of the rim and hold it there while I work the bead slowly over the rim the rest of the way around. Of all the stuff I use, the bead lubricant is probably the most important. It literally makes all the difference. Once you have all this stuff, you will be set for life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The rear tire on a Rebel is harder than the front tire because it is wider and smaller in diameter...
I was afraid of that! Windex, eh? I should try that instead of this Bead Don goo. I like your tip about the wood and forcing the bead down into the deep part of the rim too. My son's coming home for Spring Break next week and we're hoping to get some riding done, so maybe the week after that I'll try mounting the rear tire. If I can't get it, I can always take it to a shop at that point...but I hate to admit defeat.
 

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I use Windex just to help break the bead. Once the bead is broken and you can get to it with your fingers, I use the BeadBuster tire mounting lube to help remove the old tire and install the new one. BeadBuster Tire Mounting Lubricant Paste, 1-Pint/16oz, Acc-TML - American Parts Only You can get it cheaper at Amazon, but it is well worth the price in prevented frustration, damaged tubes, tires, rims, and hands. 16oz will last a lifetime. It says paste, but it is more of a gel.
 

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I use waterless hand cleaner (no-abrasive type) as tire mounting lube. Soapy water works ok (not as good) as tire lube, but should be dried from steel rims due to corrosion; dunno if that's as much of a problem with alloy wheels. I also have 3 sixteen-inch tire irons and a twenty-four inch. Even so, some rear tires are tough.

--garcia

"We're lost, but we're making good time."
 
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