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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a 2007 rebel 250, and i cant seem to get into fith gear. the fastest i have gone is 45mph. am i missing something. the bike was sitting for approximately 8 months in a garage. any suggestions for me? thanks.
 

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AFAIK there is no difference between upshifting to 4th and upshifting to 5th. So if you can get to 4th I don't see what your issue could be getting 5th.. Are you counting gears right?

What does the shifter feel like when you try to pull it up into 5th? Does it just pull up easy to its stop, or does it not want to go up at all?
 

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Yeah, i'm counting correctly. It almost feels like there isnt a fifth gear. The gear shifter will move slightly up but then just not move any higher or lock into a gear. is speed an issue at all? I suppose it feels as though if you were already in first gear, and accidently made the motions to down shift, a little give but no results.
 

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No, speed is not an issue. You can be in 5th gear at any speed, although the engine may not be happy about it. Sounds like possibly a shifter drum or fork issue. I assume the external linkage is OK or the first 4 gears would also be a problem.
Have an experienced friend or a Honda mechanic have a look at it and if he can't spot the issue, then it may require removal of the right side engine cover to check the shifting rachet mechanism.
 

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I adjusted my linkage, as shown in my link above, and can now find 5th.
Hit 55ish with no troubles. Yesterday 40-45 is about all I could do.
 

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:lol2:The Reb should be just getting started in fifth gear at 55.. Lots more where that came from.
 

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Sawed, if you are trying to count gears while not riding make sure you are rocking the bike back and forth a bit, may not always geat in gear when sitting still.
 

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I still don't understand why you couldn't get above 45 in fourth unless there is something else wrong. I have run mine up to 60 to 65 in fourth many, many times.
Its about the only good way on to an interstate.
 

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I still don't understand why you couldn't get above 45 in fourth unless there is something else wrong. I have run mine up to 60 to 65 in fourth many, many times.
Its about the only good way on to an interstate.
Same here, last time I got on the interstate I hit 70mph + in 4th before I got off the on ramp and shifted to 5th once I was on the interstate.
 

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I've hit fifth gear on several occassions and still thought I was in fourth. On sure way is hit the interstate and bring it on up if you're hitting 70-75 you in like Flint! Like Buickguy says it likes the high rpms it'll go 60-65 in 4th and love getting there. Just my pennies worth.
Gary
 

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not really sure how fast I could go in 4th, just sounded like the RPMs were getting high but not use to the sound of the rebel and have no tach so no real way to tell for sure.
 

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not really sure how fast I could go in 4th, just sounded like the RPMs were getting high but not use to the sound of the rebel and have no tach so no real way to tell for sure.
There are max speed range gear markings on the speedometer. Max speed for 4th is about 70. The rebel makes most of its zip in the upper revs.
Now, the gear ranges aren't absolutes in terms of must be in that range for those speeds but they do show a good, safe maximum for each gear.
Getting in to higher gears earlier gets better mileage but you get better acceleration holding the gears longer.
The idea is to get comfortable with the higher revs but develop a sense of what you want for where you are.
I'm not a riding instructor so my technique may not be the best but I tend to use 1st and 2nd up to their limits. Not always, but my usual launch is like that because I tend to be on roads with some 45 and mostly 50 mph speed limits.
In town, in traffic, not so much but on my usual roads that launch works.
As I get up to third, I'm only in it a short time since I'm close to the speed limit, then a short fourth and on to 5th to cruise at 50 or so. When I get to some sweepers, I'll drop to 4th to get my revs up and pull through the sweepers with the throttle. In some tighter twisties, I'll drop to 3rd and get the revs higher. I find that I can get a better lean angle with the higher revs giving me some gyroscopic effect.
Its hard to describe but the lean, speed and revs make a nice symphony of control for me to hold the line I want. A lot is going on all at once and its not something I was able to do when I was new to riding. It took me a good decade of riding to be able to utilize all the dynamics. I still would not consider myself a master of it either. In my opinion, when we stop learning its time to give it up. I guess I try to ride the Rebel like it is a sport bike but that's not exactly it either. I am always trying to improve my riding and find I still have days where my concentration is less than perfect. I've had some bad days on the road but I define a bad day as not having executed every aspect of my ride with precision.
I'd invite Duckster to comment and correct. Since he is an instructor, he can put in to terms exactly what I'm trying to say.
 

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There are max speed range gear markings on the speedometer. Max speed for 4th is about 70. The rebel makes most of its zip in the upper revs.
Now, the gear ranges aren't absolutes in terms of must be in that range for those speeds but they do show a good, safe maximum for each gear.
Getting in to higher gears earlier gets better mileage but you get better acceleration holding the gears longer.
The idea is to get comfortable with the higher revs but develop a sense of what you want for where you are.
I'm not a riding instructor so my technique may not be the best but I tend to use 1st and 2nd up to their limits. Not always, but my usual launch is like that because I tend to be on roads with some 45 and mostly 50 mph speed limits.
In town, in traffic, not so much but on my usual roads that launch works.
As I get up to third, I'm only in it a short time since I'm close to the speed limit, then a short fourth and on to 5th to cruise at 50 or so. When I get to some sweepers, I'll drop to 4th to get my revs up and pull through the sweepers with the throttle. In some tighter twisties, I'll drop to 3rd and get the revs higher. I find that I can get a better lean angle with the higher revs giving me some gyroscopic effect.
Its hard to describe but the lean, speed and revs make a nice symphony of control for me to hold the line I want. A lot is going on all at once and its not something I was able to do when I was new to riding. It took me a good decade of riding to be able to utilize all the dynamics. I still would not consider myself a master of it either. In my opinion, when we stop learning its time to give it up. I guess I try to ride the Rebel like it is a sport bike but that's not exactly it either. I am always trying to improve my riding and find I still have days where my concentration is less than perfect. I've had some bad days on the road but I define a bad day as not having executed every aspect of my ride with precision.
I'd invite Duckster to comment and correct. Since he is an instructor, he can put in to terms exactly what I'm trying to say.
This Post helped me out so much!!! You saved me a bunch of anxiety. thanks Buickguy!
 

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There are max speed range gear markings on the speedometer. Max speed for 4th is about 70. The rebel makes most of its zip in the upper revs.
Now, the gear ranges aren't absolutes in terms of must be in that range for those speeds but they do show a good, safe maximum for each gear.
Getting in to higher gears earlier gets better mileage but you get better acceleration holding the gears longer.
The idea is to get comfortable with the higher revs but develop a sense of what you want for where you are.
I'm not a riding instructor so my technique may not be the best but I tend to use 1st and 2nd up to their limits. Not always, but my usual launch is like that because I tend to be on roads with some 45 and mostly 50 mph speed limits.
In town, in traffic, not so much but on my usual roads that launch works.
As I get up to third, I'm only in it a short time since I'm close to the speed limit, then a short fourth and on to 5th to cruise at 50 or so. When I get to some sweepers, I'll drop to 4th to get my revs up and pull through the sweepers with the throttle. In some tighter twisties, I'll drop to 3rd and get the revs higher. I find that I can get a better lean angle with the higher revs giving me some gyroscopic effect.
Its hard to describe but the lean, speed and revs make a nice symphony of control for me to hold the line I want. A lot is going on all at once and its not something I was able to do when I was new to riding. It took me a good decade of riding to be able to utilize all the dynamics. I still would not consider myself a master of it either. In my opinion, when we stop learning its time to give it up. I guess I try to ride the Rebel like it is a sport bike but that's not exactly it either. I am always trying to improve my riding and find I still have days where my concentration is less than perfect. I've had some bad days on the road but I define a bad day as not having executed every aspect of my ride with precision.
I'd invite Duckster to comment and correct. Since he is an instructor, he can put in to terms exactly what I'm trying to say.
I have a lot of respect for Marty's opinions. I can't disagree with what he says here. The attitude of continuous learning and improvement is what we all should be striving for.
I taught a class this weekend and advised the students to always take pride in their riding.. To always ride like they are always being watched and judged by experts. There is nothing more satisfying to be recognized as a good rider by those that you consider to be your peers or betters in motorcycling skills.
A motorcycle is most capable of acceleration in the midpoint of its rev range. It's not lugging, and its not strung out near redline.. opening the throttle will give the best effort the machine can deliver. That's what BG is describing as "symphony of control" . Combine that with a chassis and tires that are working near potential in a cornering situation, and you have an intense motorcycling experience. I wouldn't invoke gyroscopics as part of this, but the ready availability of power coming out of a curve is part of high performance riding when you feel you are getting full measure of what there is out of the bike.
Lots of riders aren't interested in this type of thing. for them the look or appearance of bike and rider is the object. To me, the performance comes first, and the appearance of performance naturally follows.
 

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I just found this site and I have a hard time getting into 5th gear. I can only get into 5th before I hit 35 mph. Once I get any faster, I can't get into 5th, no matter what. I'm sure there's something that needs to be tweaked, but I don't know what it is. :crying:
 

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there's no logical explanation for that problem that I can think of. Something is not adding up.
 

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I have a 1985 Honda Rebel 250 cc..Been in the Honda shop lots of new parts. .When I rode it home never cud get it go into 5th gear.All other 4 shift good.Came home 4th gear Not pleasant
Rather than returning home why didn't you immediately return to the shop and ask them why as they had just worked on it..
It may have been something shop did or didn't do that has caused the problem..
 
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