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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So i blew out the seal on my bike by overfilling with oil/full puke tube. Got the flywheel off, ordered a new OEM seal. Put the new seal in (put a little oil on the edges before putting in). I gently tapped with a small hammer to get it in place. I just made it flush with the area around it, it did not "pop" in or anything. Put everything back together, refilled with oil (very carefully, made sure dipstick was only at halfway mark). Started her up and let run for 20 mins, no leak. Took her for a 1 mile spin, no leaks. Parked in driveway for 30 mins, came out to a small quarter sized oil leak on driveway. Took everything apart again, seal was still seated correctly. Inside the cover was not saturated with oil like when i busted it originally. Just a small amount. Cleaned it, put everything back together, started up.. no leaks. Took it for a 6 mile ride.. no smoking or visible leaking (i stopped along the way). Got home, let it cool down for an hour.. no leaks. Checked again 4 hours later, another quarter sized oil leak on the driveway.

Is it possible i seated the new seal incorrectly? I was very careful not to tear/rip the seal when it went in. Or do these rubber seals leak a little when new, then after time they "grow" into the seal? Im so sick of this issue!!!

-note: its in the 30's here in boston when I did this work.
 

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The new seal should not leak. Is it possible there was some residual oil inside the cover that is coming out now?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The new seal should not leak. Is it possible there was some residual oil inside the cover that is coming out now?
I thought that too, but both times I wiped the inside of the case to any excess oil. I also checked the puke tube to make sure it was empty, it was. Im sort of thinking getting some silicone sealant tomorrow, coating the outside of the seal with it.
 

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If you use a sealer on the seal make sure it is Ultra Blue. Check the crank shaft where the seal rides it should be very smooth, not nicks or dings. If you take the seal demotions to a bearing store or a place that sales seals you can get a double lip seal, but not from Honda. If your satisfied with the new installation before installing the fly wheel take a hand full of baby power and blow the power on the case where the crankshaft and seal is. This way if you have to pull it down again you can tell where the leak is coming from. It will either be from the crank shaft and running down or from the outside of the seal and running down and just in case it is not the seal you will know.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If you use a sealer on the seal make sure it is Ultra Blue. Check the crank shaft where the seal rides it should be very smooth, not nicks or dings. If you take the seal demotions to a bearing store or a place that sales seals you can get a double lip seal, but not from Honda. If your satisfied with the new installation before installing the fly wheel take a hand full of baby power and blow the power on the case where the crankshaft and seal is. This way if you have to pull it down again you can tell where the leak is coming from. It will either be from the crank shaft and running down or from the outside of the seal and running down and just in case it is not the seal you will know.
Great info. How long does the Ultra blue need to set up? I assume its just a thin amount on the outside of the seal and maybe a thin set on the outside too?
 

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It just sounds like residual oil on the inside of the case still warming up and leaking out. Quarter size oil spots don't sound like a leak unless they keep happening. Since the weather is cold, oil will flow a lot slower.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It just sounds like residual oil on the inside of the case still warming up and leaking out. Quarter size oil spots don't sound like a leak unless they keep happening. Since the weather is cold, oil will flow a lot slower.
Well i blew the seal out last weekend. bike sat all week while i waited for parts. No leaks then. Replaced and rode today, now there are (a few) quarter sized leaks.
 

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If you use the Ultra Blue, just a thin layer around the out side of the seal and let it sit overnight. Are you sure the quarter size oil leaks your seeing is coming from the weep hole on the left engine cover?
 

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Find the leak first before you go to more trouble. The baby powder sounds like a good trick.
If the seal is leaking and it is from the shaft area and not the case area the silicone won't help you there. The shaft needs to be very clean of any markings as noted and oil the inner part of the seal too that slides on the shaft if you end up replacing it again.
If there are any threaded areas on the start of the shaft use some masking tape over them when you slide the seal onto the shaft. Even a small rough spot or threaded spline can nick and damage a new seal.
 

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No way does oil leak by the soft material on the outside of the seal unless there is a cut in it or a gouge in the metal. If it is leaking around the outside, the seal is not seated in place properly. The seal should fit like a cork in a bottle. If it blows out of place from internal pressure, then of course oil will leak out..
 

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I'd back up and check that the vent tube is cleared from the engine through to the air box. He could be still building back pressure. Clearing the puke tube won't change the back pressure if it exists.
 

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Curious... If one was to remove the tube running to the airbox and replace it with one of those small round air filters, would that solve the pressure buildup problem causing the blown out seals?:confused:

Wouldn't that relieve any excess pressure buildup no matter how much oil is in the crankcase, and take the airbox separator out of the equation? :confused:
 

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Curious... If one was to remove the tube running to the airbox and replace it with one of those small round air filters, would that solve the pressure buildup problem causing the blown out seals?:confused:

Wouldn't that relieve any excess pressure buildup no matter how much oil is in the crankcase, and take the airbox separator out of the equation? :confused:
Not really. If the problem is excess oil in the crankcase, the pressure buildup could be occurring before the oil separator due to the reduced air volume in the crankcase. Also, those little airfilters are designed to foul from the OUTSIDE where you can see the dirt buildup and not from the inside where they could build an accumulation of oil and grit out of sight and out of mind.
The oil seal is not a problem on most Rebels, but it is important to keep an eye on oil level and crankcase vent system.
 

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Not really. If the problem is excess oil in the crankcase, the pressure buildup could be occurring before the oil separator due to the reduced air volume in the crankcase. Also, those little airfilters are designed to foul from the OUTSIDE where you can see the dirt buildup and not from the inside where they could build an accumulation of oil and grit out of sight and out of mind.
The oil seal is not a problem on most Rebels, but it is important to keep an eye on oil level and crankcase vent system.
So would a larger vent (hole in the top of the crankcase) solve the problem?:confused: Am I correct in thinking the pistons on the downstroke are creating the pressure that is blowing the seal out?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ok I think I found it. Took everything off today. Looked at the seal (below) and all looked good as I thought. But there was oil on the back of the sprocket. This led me to believe it was the oil seal I had replaced.



I got the seal back off and it looked fine. No nicks, rips or any tears. But i noticed the edge of the seal.. there was a burr on the metal. I must of been careless prying the old seal off with a screwdriver.



So what i did was put a bead of Ultra Blue sealant on the edge of the oil seal.. pushed in evenly with a large nut. wiped the excess with a gloved finger around the edge of the seal. cleaned up any sealant that was not on the outside edge. Waited an hour to put everything back together. Says to wait 24 hours before running bike. We will see if the sealant fixes the slow leak!
 

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If you get into it again, it would be a good idea to polish out that burr. If it leaves a pit, there is some stuff you can fill it with, but can't remember what it's called at the moment.
 

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So would a larger vent (hole in the top of the crankcase) solve the problem?:confused: Am I correct in thinking the pistons on the downstroke are creating the pressure that is blowing the seal out?
We are stealing tmyvon's thread but you are thinking in the right direction, will some what anyway. A larger vent in the crankcase would certainly release more crankcase pressure. I feel sure Honda engineers are satisfied with the design of the crankcase pressure relief system provided the available air space in the crankcase is not taken up with to much oil. When the piston is on the down stroke it will displace some air and when the piston is moving up again the same amount of air is brought back sort of like breathing. Most times when we see excess amounts of blow by (blow by combustion pressure into the crankcase) it will be in older engines where the compression rings are worn and letting the combustion in the cylinder leak into the crank case. Surly not in tmyvon's case where his engine is not old. This is why it is very important to not overfill with engine oil. :thumb:
 
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