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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, first post.
Completely new to everything motorcycle and mech related.

So I have a Rebel 250 of unknown year (it's in a building where it's been since 2014) and am starting to think about getting it running again after accepting my level of hatred towards most things 4-wheeled.

Inherited it from grampa in 2014, he let it sit outside for at least 5-6 years prior to my getting it since he lost license somehow due to seizures. Or maybe just chose not to ride it bc of seizure fear. It's been in an outbuilding since then with nothing done to it.

As far as I know, it ran fine enough before it was allowed to sit, but I'm sure that's no longer the case.

No real experience with anything mechanical, since it always bored me and never seemed relevant to anything I'd need, but am gonna need to learn since I don't have anywhere near the money to pay for anyone else to fix it, don't want to have to rely on anyone else to fix problems, and would rather know what to do immediately in the inevitable case of mech problems.

No bike license, but hate driving anything with 4 wheels and hope to eventually make it my daily in and around-town transport for cig runs and whatnot.

Any typical things to look out for with 80s Rebels?
And what's likely to be problematic with something that sat for so long? I assume anything rubber and similar to be dryrotted beyond recognition. Rusting that may be fixable with phosphoric acid soak, etc.
Total teardown, cleaning, and rebuild assumed to be necessary.
 

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1987 CMX250C
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1,673 Posts
welcome to the forum
you might peruse the PDF files Here:
where you will find a collection of instructional information relating to the Rebel

Do Not add gas and fire bike up.. fuel tank contamination can flush into carburetor,, first add an inline fuel filter.. pull plugs add a tablespoon of engine oil to cylinders before turning engine over.. I prefer to do a complete recondition of hydraulic brake, (removal of caliper pistons, master cylinder plunger) inspection, cleaning, new fluid, etc..

I've used gallons of Ospho aka phosphoric acid, never had occasion to use on Rebel.. did replace fuel tank due to rusted interior which is common with the Rebel.. You may find rust under wheel rubber strips covering spoke nuts when you replace tires/tubes..

Scroll down through the Rebel Sub-forums which cover specific systems as well as Knuckle Busting.. it's important to learn the year as there are some differences between 85-87 1st generation and 96-2016 2nd gen..
 

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I agree - do not try to start it. Drain the gas - remove carb and thoroughly clean with an ultrasonic cleaner. Carb cleaner does little to nothing to remove dried up gas.

Everything you need to know is in this forum.
 

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2001 CMX250, 1984 CB650SC
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Your blinker assembly probably needs to be disassembled, cleaned and greased, and I recommend flushing brake fluid. If you can't find all the information you need in this forum, you can always ask, but you probably didn't search enough. Happened to me more than once.
 

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1987 CMX250C
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@MaconMan77 flushing brake fluid does not remove water and crud that accumulates at bottom of caliper.. Brake fluids are hygroscopic, absorbing moisture from the atmosphere, being heaver than oil that water collects at lowest point of system along with rust and contaminates.. you can run a quart of fresh brake fluid through the master and out the caliper bleeder without cleaning out any of the contaminates that are likely to cause lowest piston to become stuck and unable to retract..
Complete caliper disassembly, cleaning, lubing of caliper slide pins is the only way to go imho..
60% to 80% of motorcycle braking is from front wheel and the one system I want to be 200% reliable..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Awesome, thanks everyone for all the heads-ups.

It's definitely going to be a full project, but I figure I'll know the bike so well by the time I'm done that there'll be nothing I can't fix on it.

Once I've got it out, taken a good look at what's visibly degraded, compared to vids and started familiarizing with everything, I'll be able to start identifying and selectively searching for specific fixes and diagnoses.
 

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Welcome to forum n enjoy your ride
 
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