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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
The gasket should extend to the carb opening, covering the o ring.
Thank you MaconMan77.
The first two prototypes my wife made with carboard, the stud holes were not the right distance apart. She made the holes bigger and now the gasket could be moved left to right as the holes were bigger than the stud size. Then I took measurements on the plenum carefully and she made two more prototypes, using cardboard again. The last two prototypes are perfect. The only thing that remains to cut the hole for the plenum. Your answer is very timely. Thank you.

My wife is very good with fine motor skills. She repaired a cheap harbor freight drill case that shattered when I dropped it from my hip height. The case had cracked around the trigger. She superglued the case. The drill worked for half a dozen years until one of my friends dropped it when he was working on his roof. The drill motor still works but it's unusable as a drill.
 

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2001 CMX250 El Bandito, 1984 CB650SC Bike Tyson
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Just don't use corrugated cardboard like this. I used a cereal box as gasket material once.
 

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That's the heaviest "patina" I've seen on a set of jets, but nowhere near the worst accumulation of crud in the bowl. A little metal polish should have the jets looking like new. I'm sure the brass float valve seat will also need polishing.

Note that there are openings at the sides of the square brass plug inside the smaller O-ring. Be sure to hit those, and every other orifice, with compressed air after cleaning and rinsing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
That's the heaviest "patina" I've seen on a set of jets, but nowhere near the worst accumulation of crud in the bowl. A little metal polish should have the jets looking like new. I'm sure the brass float valve seat will also need polishing.
Thank you flitecontrol.
The seller told me the bike was serviced every year except this last season. Could it become so bad after, say 2 years? I doubt that the carburetor was ever touched. The float bowl gasket was so hard, brittle and stuck to the bowl that it broke off. What kind of metal polish? I have used. How does one polish the seat? Is there a polishing tool that fits it? I could damage the seat if I don't do properly. I have spent hours polishing high grade vacuum pump. But that was a long time ago in a course I took in graduate school. I think I used 1200 grit but not entirely sure.
I am sure the green stuff, patina, is from oxidation of copper in the brass parts such as jets.

Note that there are openings at the sides of the square brass plug inside the smaller O-ring. Be sure to hit those, and every other orifice, with compressed air after cleaning and rinsing.
I am not sure I understand what you are referring to. I did check one in the float bowl that sends fuel to a hole in the acceleration pump pump and the the one in the float bowl gasket that gets the fuel from another hole in the pump. I wanted to see how much fuel was passing through before any cleaning and then I will check again after cleaning. That way, if I do a good job, I will know how the difference between bad and good.
 

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Any metal polish safe for brass will work. Get some on the end of a Q-tip and rotate the Q-tip against the brass seat the float valve seats against. May take several repetitions, but eventually you should have a bright, shiny seat. You'll definitely want to replace the rubber tipped float valve. Also clean the jets, but use a cloth. It's not critical, but you can also polish the brass fuel intake and overflow nipples, but that's just cosmetics. I have no idea how long it took for that patina to develop, as all the Rebel carb jets I've seen were just grungy, with no green patina. Some of those carbs sat with gas in the tank and the petcock open for a loong time. The bowl residue looked like something that came out of a septic tank.

Let the carb cleaner you use do the cleaning. Don't force metal objects through the jets. There is a fine mesh at the end of the slow jet designed to atomize the fuel. Do not run a wire through that as it will ruin it.

If you look at your picture of the bowl gasket, there's an O-ring about 3/8" in diameter that's part of the gasket. The square brass part I was referring to is inside that O-ring. IIRC, there's a similar part in the acceleration pump, also with tiny vents around it. Blow everything out with high pressure compressed air.

The acceleration pump definitely has to operate correctly, but so does everything else. Because the internal passages can't be seen, the only true test as to whether the carb is operating properly or not, is how the engine performs.
 

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I've used auto polish rubbing compound, same as used for painted surface
dip q-tip in compound twist and twirl between fingers buffing the seat..
these days I might be inclined to chuck q-tip in battery drill if real bad..

There is a non serviceable check valve under this brass plug in accelerator pump housing..
good multi day soaking or ultrasonic cleaning,,

110748


after cleaning, with fuel bowl off, having re-assembled accelerator pump to float bowl, I'll add enough fuel to cover pump intake located in bowl.. Tilt bowl so you only need enough fuel to fill pump chamber and a little above intake hole, pressing accel pump shaft if there is back flow ripples should appear on shallow fuel level surface..

USE CARE fuel should shoot into air from side gaps of square brass plug mentioned by flitecontrol.
Eye Protection.. DAMHIK ..

It's my was to assure a good strong accelerator pump spray before assembling carb

There was a time we made many of our own gaskets.. waxed milk carton was preferred material for most applications.. using ball peen hammer we would mark gasket material real nice to be cut out with exacto or other knife blade.. It's how I learned..

 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I used Brasso to polish my brass when I was a kid. I have to soak in all the information given here in the last two posts by SoakedKarma and flitecontrol. What a great resource you guys are. Thank you.

As a first step, I am soaking the float bawl and all the metal parts in distilled water in an ultrasonic cleaner. That way I can get as much loose junk as possible before soaking them in Chemdip in the can, not the ultrasonic cleaner. That way my Chemdip would not be so dirty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Float bowl after 45 minutes in ultrasonic cleaner with distilled water. The bowl looks clean but still have to make sure that the passages are unobstructed. The place where the gasket goes looks fairly clean for the gasket to seat right, I think.
IMG_20210709_182409.jpg
 

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Wow, that really got the patina off everything! Ultrasonic cleaners rock on cleaning carbs.
 

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Had to laugh. Made many a gasket for milk cartons, sheetss of cork, cereal Boxes Etc.
Takes me back.馃檪
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 · (Edited)
Wow, that really got the patina off everything! Ultrasonic cleaners rock on cleaning carbs.
I can't be sure whether the ultrasonic cleaner and distilled water has done an adequate job of cleaning all the jets and passages in the carb. So, I amy still soak them in Chemdip. I would hate to out it all together only to find out that I should have soaked in Chempdip even after the ultrasonic cleaning in distilled water. On the other, if I soak it in chemdip, I will not know if ultrasonic cleaning in distilled water is adequate. This is a decision point I need to think some more.
IMG_20210710_010312.jpg
 
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