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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I searched all over the place before asking this basic question. I found a 2007 Owners Manual PDF (I have a 2008 but can not locate a PDF for this) and a 2nd Gen Service Manual (from another thread on this form - it was on a google drive) but I am seeing inconsistencies in a couple of things.

Can someone tell me, for sure, with my 2008 year, what is needed for me in the following:
I live near in Indiana (near Chicago), my riding temp will be from 50 degrees to 100 degrees F (most likely on avg around 60 to 80 for most of my riding)

What oil weight? (NOTE: the 2007 Owners Manual only calls out for 10W-30 or 10W-40 nothing else. The 2nd Gen Service Manual - it recommends 20w-40 or 20w-50 for higher temps)

My research so far says that for me, my area, and riding style is to get 10W-40. But what do you think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also, are the cheap two-way torque wrenches acceptable to use to ensure not to over tighten the drain plug?
 

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10W-40 or 15W-40 are fine for your riding conditions. Avoid any XXW-30 oils that are not motorcycle specific as they contain friction modifiers that will ruin the wet clutch. Castrol and Shell Rotella are what most here use.

I use Harbor Freight torque wrenches, which tests have shown perform as well as those costing much more. They go on sale 3-4 times a year for around $12 each. Remember to store them at their lowest setting. I don't use a torque wrench on the oil drain bolt. All it needs is to be snug, and doesn't require a whole lot of torque. I recommend the "two finger method" to tighten the bolt. Extend two fingers, place them against the end of the wrench and tighten the bolt firmly. You won't strip the threads with this method, and the bolt will be secure. I do use a torque wrench on the valve cover bolts, as getting them too tight can cause real problems.

I cannot understand why Honda recommends a 4,000 mile oil change interval for the Rebel 250. The interval for my water cooled VN750, which has an oil filter, is 3,000 miles. The air cooled Rebel, with no oil filter, is much harder on oil than the VN750. I recommend an oil change interval of 1,000 to a maximum of 2,000 miles. I do it every 1,000 miles because it's easy to remember to change oil every time the odometer racks up another 1,000 and it only takes 1.6 quarts of oil. Forum member Buickguy put over 100,000 on his '87 with no problems, and he changed his oil every 1,250-1,500 miles IIRC.
 

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05 Honda CMX250C | 93 Kawi VN750
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To add to flite's info, anything that says "energy conserving", "resource conserving", or similar on the API specification is what to avoid like the plague. I haven't noticed any real difference between motorcycle specific oil (which is twice or three times as expensive) and typical motor oil. I did run "high mileage" once, just to see if it'd help flush out any contaminants, and it definitely came out darker at the next oil change, but that's pretty anecdotal.
 

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In the only comparison test I know of, between motorcycle specific and conventional motor oils, the conventional oils out performed the motorcycle specific oils. So IMO, there's no reason to blow big money on those more expensive oils.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In the only comparison test I know of, between motorcycle specific and conventional motor oils, the conventional oils out performed the motorcycle specific oils. So IMO, there's no reason to blow big money on those more expensive oils.
For my first Oil Change, I picked up Valvoline Motorcycle Oil 10W-40 - 4 Stroke. The price was 1.50 more than conventional Valvoline 10W-40 oil. I will keep the above in mind on my next oil change.
 

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Got a link for a good magnetic drain bolt and crush washers?
I used to have a magnetic drain bolt, but came to think it didn't do a whole lot. Think I left it in the bike when I sold my excess Rebel. One of the ads for a magnetic bolt showed one from a Rebel 250 with big chunks of metal on it. Pretty sure the rider would know there was a problem before draining that oil! All that came out on the bolt when I changed oil was a tiny bit of gooey "fuzz", like what a magnet picks up when dropped in the dirt, except it was soaked with oil. That size particle isn't going to cause much, if any damage, and will drain out when the oil is changed. That said, there are lots of them on ebay. It's a 12mm bolt, but not sure of the thread pitch.

I have the same aluminum crush washer that came with the bike. I don't overtighten it and it doesn't leak.
 

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2001 CMX250 El Bandito, 1984 CB650SC Bike Tyson, 2000 LS650 Suzuki-gun
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I'd just like the extra peace of mind with my 20 year old second hand bike. The crush washer is slightly smooshed and my parts department doesn't stock that size. I'm sure I can find the bolt and washers on my own, but I'd prefer a recommendation from the gurus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Is it okay that I opened the choke half way to idle for 5 minutes after putting in fresh oil?

Also, I oddly got 2 distinct spray spots of what looked like oil at first but wasnt as it dried clear on my driveway... it seems to be coming from the breather holes on the underside of the exhaust.

No drips while sitting off.

Odd what could that mean?

Edit: I am thinking this was just condensation from the drop in temp and it was just that and nothing more :LOL:
 

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MaconMan77 The crush washer is the same size as the ones that come with the Toyota brand oil filters I buy. The Toyota washer has a rubber face on the metal. If you want one, shoot me a self addressed envelope with postage and I'll send you one.

kezug The drops are condensation escaping from the weep holes. There's no reason to start the bike after an oil change, unless you plan to ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok, so, as a newbie to motorcycles, and while I do some mechanical stuff to our cars, this really felt good to do this on my first bike:
1. Oil change (I made it easier for myself by removing the Gear Linkage from the gear shaft. This allowed me to get my extension positioned perfectly onto the bolt head...I always wondered why others were saying their tie rod on the gear linkage was bent. I have a feeling it got bent trying to get an extender in that space and ended up pushing onto the tie rod, bending it)
2. Air Filter replacement
3. Drained the crankcase breather tube

It was fun getting to know my bike.

Thank you @flitecontrol for responding to my many questions.

And in case anyone wants to see or know what can come out of that Crankcase breather tube...here you go! 😆

110318
 

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There's a reason why it's called the "puke tube"!
 

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I searched all over the place before asking this basic question. I found a 2007 Owners Manual PDF (I have a 2008 but can not locate a PDF for this) and a 2nd Gen Service Manual (from another thread on this form - it was on a google drive) but I am seeing inconsistencies in a couple of things.

Can someone tell me, for sure, with my 2008 year, what is needed for me in the following:
I live near in Indiana (near Chicago), my riding temp will be from 50 degrees to 100 degrees F (most likely on avg around 60 to 80 for most of my riding)

What oil weight? (NOTE: the 2007 Owners Manual only calls out for 10W-30 or 10W-40 nothing else. The 2nd Gen Service Manual - it recommends 20w-40 or 20w-50 for higher temps)

My research so far says that for me, my area, and riding style is to get 10W-40. But what do you think?
I believe that Honda changed the recommendation from 10w-30 to 10w-40 primarily because the oil companies started using additives in the 10w-330 that are not good for motorcycle clutches. Either weight will be fine for most temperature ranges, but the oil container MUST have small print on it that states that it complies with JASO specifications (Japanese Motorcycle Manufacturers). Personally, I switched to Rotella T6 5w-40, a full synthetic oil last year for my 2005 Rebel. It cured a long-standing gear change problem for me, and the bike runs sweet. There should be no significant differences between the engines of all 2nd Gen Rebel 250s. When you change the oil, every 100 miles, make sure that you don't under or over-fill it. Use the dipstick attached to the oil filler plug, and screw it in when the bike is level to get the correct reading (don't just rest the plug on the threads).
 

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I believe that Honda changed the recommendation from 10w-30 to 10w-40 primarily because the oil companies started using additives in the 10w-330 that are not good for motorcycle clutches. Either weight will be fine for most temperature ranges, but the oil container MUST have small print on it that states that it complies with JASO specifications (Japanese Motorcycle Manufacturers). Personally, I switched to Rotella T6 5w-40, a full synthetic oil last year for my 2005 Rebel. It cured a long-standing gear change problem for me, and the bike runs sweet. There should be no significant differences between the engines of all 2nd Gen Rebel 250s. When you change the oil, every 100 miles, make sure that you don't under or over-fill it. Use the dipstick attached to the oil filler plug, and screw it in when the bike is level to get the correct reading (don't just rest the plug on the threads).
I thought that the oil level is checked WITHOUT screwing in the oil filler plug into the threads. Shouldn't it be inserted fully, but not threaded in? Someone please confirm. Obviously the bike should be level in either case.
 

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2002 Honda rebel 250
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To add to flite's info, anything that says "energy conserving", "resource conserving", or similar on the API specification is what to avoid like the plague. I haven't noticed any real difference between motorcycle specific oil (which is twice or three times as expensive) and typical motor oil. I did run "high mileage" once, just to see if it'd help flush out any contaminants, and it definitely came out darker at the next oil change, but that's pretty anecdotal.
Sounds like high mileage oil is better, no?
 

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05 Honda CMX250C | 93 Kawi VN750
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Sounds like high mileage oil is better, no?
It could be that the additives in that high mileage oil helped flush out some junk at the bottom of my crankcase, but it's hard to be sure. Many high mileage oils tend to stay thicker to resist heat, so it's possible that kind of "gelling" would help clump up deposits in the oil pan to flush with the oil, rather than settle. I do think that the seal conditioning additives (probably silicone or paraffinic oil) helped keep my crank seal from leaking for a while, because that leak had stopped prior to that oil change. I did replace that seal when the leak returned, of course. I haven't used motorcycle-marketed oil in some time, and haven't noticed any excessive wear in the few times I've had the top ends off my Rebel and my Vulcan. No sprinkles in my old oil, either. 🤷‍♂️
 

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It could be that the additives in that high mileage oil helped flush out some junk at the bottom of my crankcase, but it's hard to be sure. Many high mileage oils tend to stay thicker to resist heat, so it's possible that kind of "gelling" would help clump up deposits in the oil pan to flush with the oil, rather than settle. I do think that the seal conditioning additives (probably silicone or paraffinic oil) helped keep my crank seal from leaking for a while, because that leak had stopped prior to that oil change. I did replace that seal when the leak returned, of course. I haven't used motorcycle-marketed oil in some time, and haven't noticed any excessive wear in the few times I've had the top ends off my Rebel and my Vulcan. No sprinkles in my old oil, either. 🤷‍♂️
Sounds like it might not be good for the clutch.
 

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High milage oil has an additive that swells rubber o-rings and seals. If you don't have oil leaks don't use this oil. Swelling oil seals may be buy you some time before they need replacing, but why mess with good seals that are not leaking?
 
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