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Wow.. I'm pretty sure I would not have recommended a brand new rider trying this for the first time with an unstable right knee, but I'm glad things worked out for you OK.
Please get yourself signed up for a training course as soon as you can.:thumb:
I am signed up for the first training course available. I pointed out to the inspector that I did not have a motorcycle endorsement but he didn't care.
 

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dunno about there, but here it's only illegal to ride a motorcycle without an endorsement on the street, you can putter around parking lots, etc all you want
My thing is they can plainly see he's in no shape to safely operate the bike, and doesn't the inspector do a road test anyway?
this seems almost a violation of federal ADA regs, which require 'reasonable accomodation' be made for those with disabilities, even temporary ones

no matter, done and done, with no harm, but it sure seems wrong
 
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Odd how things vary from state to state. Texas will let anyone register any vehicle with the proper documents, and the proper $$. A dealership will sell a bike to anyone with the $$, but you have to have an insurance rider to take it off the lot. No license required, just a fax from an insurance agency. Technically, the insurance doesn't cover an unlicensed operator, but the dealer is covered. It's harder to recover a vehicle from a contract tow lot. Regardless of the reason for the tow, you have to provide a license and insurance to bail your car or bike out.:banghead::banghead:
 

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if you pay cash for the vehicle you can take it off the lot (on a trailer) without insurance
they sell tons of dirtbikes this way
I think the dealers make a stink about it because (1) it makes it harder for them to prove the vehicle is no longer in their stock and (2) they want that Doc fee, you know, the 100-500 bux they charge you for their administrative assistant (secretary to all the salesmen) to mail the fool title application to the DMV so they can mail you your title / regidtration sticker
 

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dunno about there, but here it's only illegal to ride a motorcycle without an endorsement on the street, you can putter around parking lots, etc all you want
Key issue there being "private property clauses". Of which a government run department of motor vehicles property is not. ;)

The DMV requires passing a written test prior to any riding or driving test. There are all sorts of legal reasons for that, chief among them being is those tests commence (and in the case of motorcycles, remain) on their public property.

Regardless of the reason for the tow, you have to provide a license and insurance to bail your car or bike out.:banghead::banghead:
From a private towing yard? You have to be the titled owner as proven by vehicle registration and ID. In other words, if you get dad's car towed dad is the only one who can get it back out.

From police impound, well I can't speak from experience on that angle.
 

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I had my car trailer towed once as I did not realize that the inspection expired. I had to produce the titel which was hard to do as it was a titleless home made trailer which PA issues "digital titles" so I had to find the original receipt for that.

Every state has their own rules. Here in DE they do a brake, signal, horn etc test which I guess you have to be on the bike to do. The DMV parking lot is state property and not a public road perhaps so road rules don't apply (I'm guessing). Also, in DE if you take (and pass) the mortorcycle course, you don't have to take the road test.

I had two crotch rocket guys behind me in line so I felt pretty silly and I did stall the engine once. But I survived. I'm all about safety gear and felt naked without it.
 

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Inspections here are performed at privately owned inspection stations, no inspection is required to register a bike, so you wouldn't need to ride the bike to get it registered (I didn't even bring the last two bikes I registered)
and the state inspector, not the cyclist, rides the bike for the braking test (the only test for which the bike need move) so it still wouldn't have been an issue, but good point about the DMV not being public property
of course there's also a point of law here that you can't be prosecuted for performing an illegal act (such as accessing you firearm, securly locked in a safe in the trunk of your car, wile under the influece of alchohol) if ordered to do so by a LEO
 

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As a newbie here, and reading through forum posts, this one caught my eye, although it has drifted off topic. Back to the original topic, stopping with left foot down: I've been riding nearly 50 years in a large variety of conditions and only took the class this year. I never heard of or concentrated on the "ready to ride position" before, but I think of it now, and I consciously practice it and like it. This and a couple of other things in the class fall into the category of teaching new tricks to an old dog. Not really tricks, but an open mind to safety suggestions is never a bad idea. I've always thought that arrogance and overconfidence are not very useful traits for safety, or for the general reputation of bikers. Every new rider should know that if they ride long enough, they will encounter unexpected, life-threatening events, and it is best to try to anticipate what bad thing might happen at any time, and always be aware of what they are doing. There may be situations where you consciously need to modify a general rule, but the ready to ride position falls into the category of being aware, and developing good habits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Every new rider should ..........always be aware of what they are doing. There may be situations where you consciously need to modify a general rule, but the ready to ride position falls into the category of being aware, and developing good habits.
That's the essential reasoning behind it. Develop good habits and practice them so that you will always be in the best position to deal with something unexpected. Riding should be a series of deliberate choices not just dumb luck as to which foot or feet you will put down on the next stop. Each appendage only has one job to do, simple and easy.
As you point out, every rule will have exceptions from time to time, but riding systematically is always a good idea. :thumb:
 

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I will admit I'm completely opposite. Always have been:surprise:
Right foot on ground & left on shifter in first. Right hand on front brake. I'm ready to ride no problem in this position .. and I have a few times over the past 30 years. I will try ducks tip and see if a old dog can learn a new trick?
 

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I will admit I'm completely opposite. Always have been:surprise:
Right foot on ground & left on shifter in first.
Well if you had an Ironhead Sportster you'd be doing it right. :D
 

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Again CONSISTENCY is your friend.. Get in the habit of cancelling the signal as you straighten the bike on course after your turn and do it that way EVERY TIME. After a while you'll do it without even thinking about it automatically as part of the turn.
One silly thing the MSF didn't teach me was that pressing the signal switch shut it off.... For the first week with my Rebel I was constantly moving the switch left and right to get it shut off, thinking I needed a new switch. Then I accidentally discovered pushing. I went back to the MSF Basic Rider Course manual, and the Rebel manual, and didn't find I missed anything! Neither told me to push the switch off. Silly stuff, but frustrating. As soon as I finish the turn my thumb pushes, now being muscle memory after over 2,000 miles. I don't recall my years with the KZ1000 long ago well enough to remember if I knew to push it off back then.
 

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The KZ1000 did not have the push to cancel signal feature.
 

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You will have to elaborate on that pun cause it went over my head :nonono:
The Ironhead Sporties had reversed foot controls to emulate the Brit bikes of that era...brake on the left and shifter on the right. It allowed gear shifting while flat-tracking, where the left foot went down for the left turns.

 

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The KZ1000 did not have the push to cancel signal feature.
Thanks Old School, it'a nice to know I'm not experiencing early dementia, I don't think I'd have forgot something like that. If I'm honest... I was in the Army at the time, and rarely used the signals anyway, I just wanted to go faster than the guy next to me. My mother issued me a brain and the Army took it away evidently. Or so goes my excuse? :grin2:
 

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That going faster I can relate to. I traded my Kawasaki KZ1000 for a Honda CBX 1000 six cylinder.
 

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Faster was better back then. Today I enjoy slow. I sold my KZ to a fellow soldier when I was posted to Ft. William D. Davis in Panama for a 3 year duty. Selling that bike probably saved my life! How much faster was the CBX?
 

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Faster was better back then. Today I enjoy slow. I sold my KZ to a fellow soldier when I was posted to Ft. William D. Davis in Panama for a 3 year duty. Selling that bike probably saved my life! How much faster was the CBX?
Much faster, the CBX with rider and passenger could out run the KZ with just rider. There was a large banner in the Honda show room that stated-- the CBX was designed to be the quickest accelerating standard production land vehicle ever marketed -- And in the corner of that banner said --- and darn well is --
 

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It was all about speed back then.... every year one manufacturer or another was selling widow makers! I just read a review in Cycle World of a superbike able to easily run 200mph with plenty of throttle left for speed aficionados. Well over a hundred horses.... wow. Not for me anymore. Or maybe just one ride? :)
 
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