Honda Rebel Forum banner

1 - 20 of 105 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Everyone who has taken BRC knows that the "ready to ride" position is defined as stopped on the motorcycle in the riding position with the right foot on the brake pedal and the left foot down holding up the bike. This allows for holding the bike with the rear brake while stopped.
Lots of people have difficulty trying to stop with the left foot down every time. It seems that as the speed bleeds off, it becomes more of a random chance as to which foot is going to have to go down to hold the bike up.
An easy solution is to start a normal left turn, just as the bike is stopping. This is guaranteed to put the bike over to the left side .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,771 Posts
This Thread Has Been Made Sticky!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Great tip. I must admit to some randomness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,083 Posts
Just put your new Iphone in your left pocket....you are guaranteed to lean left every time at a stop!:lol2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
I'm reminded of the time I said to my psychiatrist, "Dr, I think I've had a mental breakdown!" His response, "Your not smart enough to have a mental breakdown."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
670 Posts
I'm reminded of the time I said to my psychiatrist, "Dr, I think I've had a mental breakdown!" His response, "Your not smart enough to have a mental breakdown."
:lol2::lol2::lol2::lol2::lol2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I have always considered it important to stop with the front wheel straight. I would be a bit concerned that with this tip a new rider might make a stop with too much turn to the wheel and find that "over on the left side" might really mean OVER on the left side - as in on the ground if tried with a heavier bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
& if you can think about starting a turn as you stop you can think about consciously shifting your weight to the left while putting your foot down. Would take about the same amount of concentration/effort without tricks. Then you could do it no matter the situation & soon it would just be second nature. Not that it takes much thought anyway... JMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Much easier to flick your handlebars a little to the right if you find yourself coming down on the right side than to start wiggling your carcass around on the bike, but by all means whatever works for you. I just thought I'd offer a little pointer there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
I wouldn't have known this fact about the left foot down each time could be helpful. Give me some more helpfull advice and I'll thank you in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,575 Posts
Much easier to flick your handlebars a little to the right if you find yourself coming down on the right side than to start wiggling your carcass around on the bike, but by all means whatever works for you. I just thought I'd offer a little pointer there.
Ducksters got it spot on. Do it every time and soon it will become second nature. Slooow and Smoooth.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
Ok I have to agree with peewee, I'm totally confused here over making something so simple appear so difficult. To a new and inexperienced rider (any rider for that matter) the best AND safest method of holding a bike up is with BOTH feet planted firmly on the ground. Sorry, no one will ever be able produce credible evidence to convince me otherwise.

Simply grab a hand full of FRONT brake when stopped. This is just another example of why I question some of the training provided at these rider training courses, and am glad I didn't have to endure one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Planting both feet at a stop works fine, as does holding the bike with the front brake. The only problem comes if you stop on a hill (and its not that much of a problem for an experienced rider). Then you need to operate the throttle while preventing the bike from rolling backwards with the front brake lever all with the right hand until the bike is ready to pull ahead . Meanwhile your right foot is flopping around redundantly not doing much of anything to help the situation. It's a whole lot simpler and much easier for a newbie to hold the bike with the right foot on the rear brake while the throttle hand is free just to rev the engine as needed for a nice smooth hill start.

I would also take issue with your assertion that 2 feet down is safer than left foot down.
I suggest that if you have both feet down you are constantly dancing the bike back and forth randomly between your left and right feet. At any given instant one foot or the other is holding the bike up since its not likely to ever be sitting on that knife edge of perfect balance. (if you think it is then pick up BOTH feet and prove it. :thumb:)
So how is this any safer than always knowing which side the bike is leaned toward and using your left foot to hold the bike up, your right foot on the brake to keep the bike from rolling away, your right hand to run the throttle and your left hand to run the clutch. Each extremity has one simple job to do. no fancy co-ordination of throttle and brake needed .

And that's why MSF teaches a standard "ready to ride" position.

I'll admit to sometimes doing it your way before I started instructing, but I find the left foot down to be much a more economical and precise way of doing it, and it makes you look like you know what you're doing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
30,346 Posts
The purpose in stopping with the left foot down (after downshifting) is so the right can operate the foot brake. The right hand is on the throttle, the left is holding the clutch lever in, and the eyes are on the mirrors, watching to ensure an inattentive driver doesn't make a bumper sandwich out of you and the bike. All this is part of the basic rider course. It has saved my bacon, and others have said the same. Or you can wind up like this:

Motorcycle gets rear ended picture | South Bay Riders
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
Well we'll just have to shake hands and agree to disagree.:thumb:

First, I could care less if I "look" like I know what I'm doing. While anything can happen, FIRST and FOREMOST by the grace of God, and second, almost 40 years of riding experience I think I know what I'm doing. I say that knowing motorcycle riding is risky, and any of us could be involved in an accident and/or killed at any moment, I have decided the enjoyment of it out weighs the risk involved.

Somehow I'm able to plant both feet on the ground, hold the front brake AND watch my mirrors. Again, anything can happen but I really doubt that IF a bumper sandwich is looking to happen God forbid, the fact my right foot is on the brake "looking like I know what I'm doing" has a higher chance of saving me anymore than letting off a brake lever. I say that as I learned long ago to control the throttle AND have two fingers on a brake lever when situations call for it.

Call me a rebel I guess....:D
 
1 - 20 of 105 Posts
Top