Honda Rebel Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, truthfully, the title hasn't been signed over yet, but the deal is pretty much done and I'm super excited. I've been looking for one of these to learn on and conveniently found one for sale a 10 minutes walk from me. I'm a little intimidated by the age of the bike but it's only got 5000 miles on it and the seller is a sweetheart, seems to have kept it in great shape and gave me an honest rundown of its quirks.

A few questions for anyone who happens to read this - first, while I figure out balancing (I've never ridden!) going suuuper slowly, I was thinking of installing crash bars to help me avoid dropping it and ruining one of the discontinued parts I'll then never be able to replace. Anyone have a good source on these for an older model? Also, I read a lot about crash bars on here and don't think I'd keep it on once I started riding at higher speeds. I'm sort of treating them like training wheels.

Second, I'd appreciate any tips on finding replacement parts for this old of a bike. The shifter pedal works but is sticky between neutral and 2nd and the seller told me it can only be fixed by buying a new shifter pedal/set. He replaced a pin with a screw, apparently, which causes that small problem. The part (#19) is discontinued but I'm trying to track it down.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
30,605 Posts
Welcome to the forum. There are usually used parts for the first generation Rebels (1985-87) on ebay. Many of the parts are interchangeable with the second generation (1996-2016) bikes, and new parts are still available.

The best way to learn to ride is to take a basic rider course, such as those offered by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF). Studies have shown that self/friend/relative taught riders have more crashes than professionally taught riders. MSF courses, or their equivalent, are offered in every state. Do you know how to ride a bicycle? If not, do not try to ride a motorcycle! You stand to cause yourself serious injury if you do. The only prerequisite for the MSF course is knowing how to ride a bicycle. Teaching yourself how to ride while waiting for an opening in a MSF course usually results in teaching yourself bad habits. It's best to park the bike until you've taken the course.

Like riding a bicycle, motorcycles are less stable at very slow speeds, so extremely slow riding, especially by novices, tends to lead to crashes. If you drop the Rebel while going slow, you aren't likely to do much more than bend a clutch or brake lever or other. The first generation Rebels have the front turn signals mounted higher than on the second generation, and are less likely to hit, and dent, the gas tank. Many Rebels sport dented tanks because most new riders drop their rides at least once.
 

·
Registered
85 CMX 250C, 82 GW Remember that you are invisible, treat all others accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
Joined
·
408 Posts
1st, welcome.
Years ago I thought about this, so I searched & bought a parts bike.
Ebay has parts like these frequently. Make sure to scrutinize the pictures thoroughly.
It's best to get them sooner rather than trying to find them when something breaks.
Like flitecontrol said, shifter, brake & clutch levers are the most likely candidates.
I keep the engine guard on my Rebel more to protect in case of a crash. I did suffer my only crash at 55 mph & the guard helped wonders. Bike was completely ridable, although I however wasn't in the best condition. It's also good for foot pegs for when you become more experienced.

And, ....Do you know how to ride a bicycle?
 

·
Super Moderator
1987 CMX250C AC
Joined
·
2,107 Posts
Welcome to the forum
1st generation 85-87 Rebel Left foot peg/side stand assembly is exclusive to those years only..
They are found from time to time on eBay.. Must be one of those three years or it won't bolt to frame..

Shifter pivot point is a rod welded into cast framework.. (circled)
Pivot rod/pin is center tapped for bolt and washer (blue arrow) to retain shift pedal.
that rod/pin has been a problem for some when broken off..

a good machinist could devise a replacement pivot

110768


When you have shift lever off, remove smal rear left side cover.. there is a needle bearing in that cover where shifter shaft passes through that needs to be cleaned and greased..
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,141 Posts
Be careful shopping on eBay. Sellers often don't understand the differences between 1st and 2nd generation Rebels. This ad, for example, says it will fit your bike but it will definitely not.


You need the exact part pictured above or, as SoakKarma said, have yours fixed.
 

·
Registered
85 CMX 250C, 82 GW Remember that you are invisible, treat all others accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
Joined
·
408 Posts
I was wanting the same, so I kept watching ebay. June 14th I bought 1 of these for $9.95 (+$10 shipping). They come up now & again. My shifter peg was working but damaged. It has been wobbling for a while & now I can finally fix it.
I'd suggest the buy it now option when you finally find it. Many of us have been searching, so it'll get grabbed quickly.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,870 Posts
Welcome to forum n enjoy your ride
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Welcome to the forum. There are usually used parts for the first generation Rebels (1985-87) on ebay. Many of the parts are interchangeable with the second generation (1996-2016) bikes, and new parts are still available.

The best way to learn to ride is to take a basic rider course, such as those offered by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF). Studies have shown that self/friend/relative taught riders have more crashes than professionally taught riders. MSF courses, or their equivalent, are offered in every state. Do you know how to ride a bicycle? If not, do not try to ride a motorcycle! You stand to cause yourself serious injury if you do. The only prerequisite for the MSF course is knowing how to ride a bicycle. Teaching yourself how to ride while waiting for an opening in a MSF course usually results in teaching yourself bad habits. It's best to park the bike until you've taken the course.

Like riding a bicycle, motorcycles are less stable at very slow speeds, so extremely slow riding, especially by novices, tends to lead to crashes. If you drop the Rebel while going slow, you aren't likely to do much more than bend a clutch or brake lever or other. The first generation Rebels have the front turn signals mounted higher than on the second generation, and are less likely to hit, and dent, the gas tank. Many Rebels sport dented tanks because most new riders drop their rides at least once.
Just saw this post from you too. Really appreciate all of the help and the warm welcome.

About the MSF classes - I totally agree with you. I normally do everything by the book and take all the help I can get from those who know what they're doing, especially when the activity in question can lead to injury! However, I found myself in the unfortunate situation of being unaware of everyone else in my city apparently fulfilling their long-term dream at the same time as me (or, maybe just signing up for the classes on a whim) - our classes are fully booked with a 1000-person waitlist at this point. I signed up in February or March and at this point, it looks like it isn't going to happen before my schedule gets too busy. Bummer, but thank you so much for the advice and overall encouragement. It inspired me to download the MSF book because (since I'm gonna do it anyway ;) ) I figured that's the closest I'll get to safe-ish self-taught.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
30,605 Posts
I don't know the procedures for folks that don't show in your area, but locally, if someone doesn't show at the first meeting, they take folks on a first come, first served basis. In large classes, there usually are one or two no-shows. IIRC, one or two that were scheduled for a later class got into the one I took.

I too taught myself to ride from the time I bought the Rebel until taking the class a few months later. I managed to pick up some bad habits during that time, and it took quite a while to break them.

A good addition to the course is to read David Hough's books, Proficient Motorcycling, and More Proficient Motorcycling. If your local library doesn't have them, they may get them if requested. Even if they don't, it's well worth the investment in your safety and riding career. Read them, do it again in six months, and then a year after that. You'll be surprised how much more useful information you'll get out of subsequent readings.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top