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Hi Everyone!

I'm Maca and I live in SoCal, I got my first bike ever a couple of days ago and im just excited to start my journey in the motorcycle world :)

The bike is a Rebel from 1985 and so far it is working great. It starts right up and I went on a couple of short rides around the neighborhood and it feels and shift good (from what I could tell from experience in manual cars). However, I still would like to do some basic maintenance before I start really taking it out. I want to change the tires, fluids and air filters to have a clean start, anything else I should add to the list of things to check/clean? also any idea were I can buy or download a service manual?
 

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Welcome to the forum. You can add lubing the chain and all the shifter and brake pivot points to the list.
 

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Welcome
simple wash out of foam air filter than add new oil assuming foam hasn't deteriorated over the years..
No oil filter, most change oil every 1000 miles or so..
always a good idea to flush out brake fluid imo, I prefer to pop out caliper pistons and clean out gunk that has accumulated at bottom of caliper..
Sections of 85-87 1st generation service manual can be found on google drive, should cover all you will need to keep you bike serviced..
 
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Welcome to the forum. You can determine the age of the tires by looking on the sidewall. Instructions here: Determining the Age of a Tire | Tire Rack

If the rubber is soft enough to dent slightly with your thumb nail, it's still good.
 
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Congrats on your bike. I got my first last month. Cold here now in New England. I have had it out a few times but I can't wait for spring.
 
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Welcome
simple wash out of foam air filter than add new oil assuming foam hasn't deteriorated over the years..
No oil filter, most change oil every 1000 miles or so..
always a good idea to flush out brake fluid imo, I prefer to pop out caliper pistons and clean out gunk that has accumulated at bottom of caliper..
Sections of 85-87 1st generation service manual can be found on google drive, should cover all you will need to keep you bike serviced..
Thank you so much for the link to the manual! I've never work in a motorcycle so it will definitely come in handy. Any recommendations of what oil I should use?
 

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Congrats on your bike. I got my first last month. Cold here now in New England. I have had it out a few times but I can't wait for spring.
thank you and congrats on your bike too! I used to live in New England and I can't imagine going for a ride in the middle of January hahahha
 

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Welcome to the forum. You can determine the age of the tires by looking on the sidewall. Instructions here: Determining the Age of a Tire | Tire Rack

If the rubber is soft enough to dent slightly with your thumb nail, it's still good.
Thank you for the tip! I definitely don't wanna change them if they still have life on them, specially since I plan to spend most of my time close to home and in parking lots while I gain confidence riding :)
 

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@flying_sloth oil for foam air filter comes from many brand makers..
i wash foam out with gas/kerosene mix and coat with what ever engine oil is handy..

that said there are some good reasons to use an oil for foam air filters..
 

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Any recommendations of what oil I should use?
Many forum members use oil in the XX-40 range, unless they live where it gets extremely hot and may use a XX-50 weight oil instead. I use Shell Rotella 15W-40, but Castrol is also a popular brand. Don't use automotive oils in the XX-30 class as they contain friction modifiers that will ruin the Rebel's clutch. There are motorcycle specific oils that don't contain friction modifiers, but they tend to cost a lot more, and haven't been shown to be any better than XX-40. The key to a long engine life is regular oil changes. Member Buickguy put over 100,000 miles on his Rebel with no engine problems, using Castrol IIRC.
 
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Many forum members use oil in the XX-40 range, unless they live where it gets extremely hot and may use a XX-50 weight oil instead. I use Shell Rotella 15W-40, but Castrol is also a popular brand. Don't use automotive oils in the XX-30 class as they contain friction modifiers that will ruin the Rebel's clutch. There are motorcycle specific oils that don't contain friction modifiers, but they tend to cost a lot more, and haven't been shown to be any better than XX-40. The key to a long engine life is regular oil changes. Member Buickguy put over 100,000 miles on his Rebel with no engine problems, using Castrol IIRC.
is it this one?
 

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Yes, that's a good oil. Change oil much more often than the 4,000 mile interval Honda Recommends for the Rebel. That's a 1,000 miles longer than Kawasaki recommends for my VN750, which is water cooled and has an oil filter. I suggest a 1,000 to 1,500 mile interval. Only takes 1.6 quarts to change the Rebel's engine. Dipstick is checked with the bike level and the stick unscrewed and resting on the threads.
 
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I use 15w 40 generally and top up with 20w 50 if needed during summer here in the desert..
I keep diesel engine oil on the shelf for several pieces of industrial equipment, buying whatever 6 gallon case is on sale..
There is a suspected correlation between left side crank seal blowing out due to over filling crank case..
Two or three cases annually are discussed here on average.. couple of owners have re-inserted old seal and had no further problem.. most replace with new seal.. This procidure requires removal of kick stand/shifter/foot peg assembly, left side cover, and alternator flywheel to get at the seal..
Filling just short of maximum limit on dip stick is the way I go..

P.S. Stock muffler and frame are aligned in such a way as to allow a ratchet extension to be passed between them and attached to socket placed on drain plug..
 
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