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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
As I've mentioned in another thread, I'm looking to replace my 10 year old tires and tubes with 10k miles and a lot of weather exposure. I wanted to compile a list of the required tools I'll need. It'd be great if others who've done the jobs themselves could weigh in on the tools they use for the job (bonus points for including a link or Part Number). My guess is that many people have gotten by with less expensive tools.

I'll update this list based on feedback from the community. I'm not recommending the products below. I'm simply trying to compile some of my research.

What's missing? What did you use instead?

Required Tools for changing a Rebel's tires




Tires and Tubes
 

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1987 CMX250C AC
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Chromed steel wheels don't need rim protectors imo, never used them except on aluminum wheels
handful of gift cards available at any cash register folded or molded w/heat gun and make your own, it's what I use.
They make great disposable scrapers too

Prefer leverage of curved irons,, imho you will need a 3rd iron/spoon be it a screw driver or what ever
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005DHY1XW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 No longer available
length is important too
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LY9OGCV?psc=1

tube type rims don't lock onto bead like tubeless rims do.. bead is rather easy to break
When it's not I use a C-clamp, vice also works.

Balancing done suspended between two jack stands
Truing done while mounted on bike w/popsicle stick taped to fork or trailing arm

you forgot wheel weights, tire pressure gauge
On my wish list, don't change enough tires to justify tho~ I wrestle wheel around on the floor
https://www.amazon.com/Pit-Posse-Mo...93094&sr=1-2&keywords=motorcycle+tire+changer
 

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bud light, it's the number one tool to do any job!!!
http://www.budlight.com/

That seems to be a pretty good list, the only thing I could add is a good lift, or jack and the correct size wrenches with a box end or a good socket set.
A torque wrench if you can't do it by feel.
 

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I have used ViseGrips clamped onto the rim to hold the bead in place. I use a small piece of leather between the ViseGrips and rim to prevent damage to the rim. Motion Pro also make a device called a Bead Buddy that does basically the same thing on wire spoked wheels. I used to have a problem keeping the bead in place while installing tires. I'd get the bead on about half the way around, then it would start slipping off. Either of the above methods prevent that from happening.

I don't use any kind of powder on tubes. For me it would be pointless. I use a lot of lubricant on the tire bead, and it would just soak the powder. I have used all kinds of things for tire mounting lube. Ru-Glyde works well, but so does Windex, WD-40, Armor All or anything else similar, furniture polish, vaseline, in an emergency I even used wheel bearing grease. I've never had an issue with any of these things. Once you get the tire completely on, take a rag, paper towels, etc. and clean off as much of it as you can before inflating the tire. What little bit is left will help seat the bead evenly around the wheel. A fully inflated tire will not slip on the rim no matter what you used. You do need to be careful not to damage the tube, but that is more just being careful than anything else. Don't stick the tire lever too far in between the tire and wheel, and make sure the tube is not getting pinched between the tire and rim. Once installed, I partially inflate the tube to straighten it out, then let the air out, squeeze the tire beads in all the way around the tire to push the tube back toward the middle, then inflate the tire fully. I don't use soap and water as a lubricant because it can be corrosive, and cause the wheel to rust inside.

The Rebel is the only bike I have with tube type tires and no centerstand. And since a lift does not work well with the Rebel anyway because of the exhaust pipes, something has to be rigged. I just place a piece of 2x4 or 2x6 under the sidestand to get the bike as level as possible, then use a small scissors jack under the frame or swing arm on the right side. Before jacking it up, I loosen all the nuts, and remove the chain guard, so I won't have to apply much force to remove the wheel while the bike is on the jack. I use a bungee cord to hold the chain up off the ground.
 

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What about the tools you would need to get the wheels off the bike like wrenches, etc?
 

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What about the tools you would need to get the wheels off the bike like wrenches, etc?
get a metric socket set with at least 10,12,14, and 18mm maybe 16mm also I believe and you'll need an adjustable wrench to hold the rear axle while you remove / replace the axle nut
 

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I know the axle nut on the 450 is 19mm-3/4" (they're interchangeable), but not sure about the 250 axle nut size.
 

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Was changing the punctured tube in the rear wheel on my 1980 Honda CM200T during the summer of 1984 in the parking lot of the apartment complex. I had not even heard of paddock stands back then. Bought the tube in the morning from the local Honda dealer from whom I had bought the bike new just a few months before. I think the tube cost $5 or so. I laid the bike on the side to remove the wheel. Took the wheel to my kitchen, got the tyre and old tube off the rim, slipped the new tube and the tyre on the rim. Pumped it up with a foot pump only to find that I had nicked/punctured the tube. Drove up to the friendly Honda dealer to purchase another tube. "What happened? Did you nick the tube?" , the parts guy asked me. "Yeah, it was my first time", I said.
"Almost everyone does it once in their life, especially the first time. I'll give you a $2 discount for our repeat tube customer". That was nice. Installed the wheel and aligned it with the front wheel. I did not balance it as I had no means of doing it. I rode it to NYC and Washington D.C. a few times. Never felt any wheel vibration.

Had a shop change tyres on my 1998 VStar 650 at a shop. The PO has installed starght pipes, which I didn't like. The shop agreed to swap them out for stock mufflers they had in the shop at no cost and rejet the carb to stock size.

I rode off happy after paying. I was still in their driveway when I smelled gas. They had forgotten to reconnect the fuel line to the petcock. NO charge to reconnect the fuel line. :p

They had done static balancing---that's all they had the equipment for. Front end was like sewing machine. The rim was out of round probably because I had had an encounter with a ditch. I didn't lose control of the bike although we were both airborne but landed the right side up and continued to roll on. I was lucky. It was quite a stunt
 
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