Honda Rebel Forum banner

21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
ive stood on mine just to get a quick stretch thats all
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,578 Posts
I can stand on mine. That's why I designed them with a three point mount...
My MSF instructor was emphatic about using the pegs when encountering potholes and unavoidable objects in your path. I developed the habit from that point on, and it does help you maintain control. It also takes your weight of the handlebars when negotiating loose surfaces and tight turns.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,279 Posts
Your MSF instructor was right, but most cruisers can't be ridden that way. In order to have a low seat height, and upright riding position, and room for your legs, the pegs must be mounted way out front. Sportbikes have the opposite problem, their pegs are mounted way too far back and way to high, basically designed for laying down on the bike. Dirt bikes, dual sport bikes, and standard style bikes are about the only bikes that you can stand on the pegs on anymore. It is mandatory while riding a dirt bike, which is one reason dirt riding beats you up so bad. I'm just about too old to do much dirt riding anymore. Jerry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Your MSF instructor was right, but most cruisers can't be ridden that way. In order to have a low seat height, and upright riding position, and room for your legs, the pegs must be mounted way out front.
I thought the Rebel's foot peg location was perfect; but then I'm only 5'8".

If my new VLX's were any further forward than they are I couldn't reach them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I've just taken the plate out of mine as well, haven't gotten on the road with it yet, but from what I've read it's probably the most I'll need to do. However my wife hates the rear seat. Does the Corbin improve the passenger's ride? Is it wider or softer than the OEM pillion?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
967 Posts
I don,t recall the toture plate removal procedure but am inerested. Is there a thread on here? About the pegs though, I am 5'7" and the stock position is pretty good but I still find myself using both the highway pegs and passenger pegs to keep from getting numb-ass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,770 Posts
If someone is going to do the 'plate-ectomy', we sure would apprecite it if you could do a play-by-play picture tutorial so we can share it with other numb butts on the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
It was so easy and fast I didn't even consider taking pics. I'll be happy to step it out here though.
Tools you will need:
1. Wrench or ratchet/socket sizes appropriate to remove both seats.
2. Pliers for pulling staples(I used needle nose)
3. Very sharp knife (I used a box cutter with a new blade)
4. Staple gun (Electric is preferred but I'm sure any decent staple gun will do.
Procedure:
1. Removed the two screws securing the pillion seat and remove pillion.
2. Remove the two screws securing front seat and removed seat.
3. Flip seat over and removed all staples. It is not required to removed the bracket or the staples under the bracket.
4. Peel cover back from around edges and pull the plastic seat pan (that's the bottom of the seat) back towards the bracket. The pan and bracket should flop right back exposing the entire bottom of the foam.
5. Locate the metal plate. Look for a couple forming holes near the back, you should be able to see some gold colored metal through these holes, if not just poke around until you feel the plate.
6. Once located, using EXTREME CAUTION, cut the foam around the plate. At this point you are risking cutting the seat cover as well as yourself. The plate itself is about 7 inches wide in the shape of a kidney.
7. Get a couple fingers under one end of the plate and peel it out, as it's glued in some force will be required.
8. With plate removed, use the knife to removed as much foam as you can from it(all is preferred). Place this loose foam back in the hole from where the plate was.
9. Fold the pan and bracket back into position and pull the seat cover back around the edges.
10. While pulling the cover tight staple back into position(two people recommended for this step but it's doable with only one) Yes, the staples will go right through the plastic pan and hold tight. Just keep the tension even as you work around the edge so you don't end up with wrinkles.
11. Reinstall seat and pillion in reverse order.
12. Last but not least, RIDE!!.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,770 Posts
Cool. Now if someone were to use these instructions and take pictures to match that would be great!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Finally after a month of not riding, either due to needing a cage to haul things or the large amount of overdue maintenance required on the bike. The removal of the plate is certainly noticable, I can actually feel my butt sinking in a little more than it used to. No more pressure point on my tailbone. Only had about 20 miles to go this morning but I'm hoping after a longer ride I'm just as happy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
785 Posts
Do the classics (85-87) also have the plate?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I happen to think the stock Vulcan 750 seat is the most comfortable seat of any motorcycle I've ever had, including a couple of early '80s Goldwings. I can ride on it all day with no pain at all. It does help considerably to change from the rider pegs to the passenger pegs once in a while to prevent leg cramps.

A Corbin seat is more comfortable than a stock seat in most cases, but the price is ridiculous. I admit I did put a Corbin seat on my new '09 Ninja 500, and along with foam grips and GenMar handlebar risers, it made the bike a LOT more comfortable. I can have my sportbike and ride it without serious pain.


As far as the Rebel, make sure the problem is actually with the seat. The Rebel seat is not the most comfortable seat in the world (that would be the stock Vulcan 750 seat), but many people condemn the seat when most of the problem is actually with the pegs. For some reason, Honda chose to put the pegs way too far back for your average sized person (I'm 6' with a 34" inseam), and there is simply no place to put your legs. Your legs get all bent up between the seat and the pegs, which not only causes leg pain, but changes your position on the seat from what it should be. I found that simply moving the pegs 4" farther forward completely solved the problem. The seat still does not compare to the Vulcan 750, but I never expected it to. I can ride all day on it though, with just a few short breaks, like stopping for gas and food, with very little pain.

If you mostly ride on short trips or around town, your best bet would be to fabricate brackets to relocate the pegs, shifter, and rear brake a few inches forward, which is what I did. There are various ways of doing this, several people here have done it, and everybody did theirs slightly differently. If you mostly ride on the highway where you don't use the shifter and brake much, you could probably get away with just using highway pegs (don't get the motormount ones from MC Enterprises though, unless you can figure out a way to weld them on, they will not work). You want the highway pegs to be forward of the stock pegs, but not much higher. If they are 10" higher, they will b e worse than the stock pegs. Once you get the pegs moved out front a bit, your position on the seat will change too, and it will feel a lot more comfortable. Jerry.
I know this is 11 years old and all. But do you have pictures
 
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top