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Thanks for the detailed post, bikelearner. I am a new owner/rider who wants to maintain my bike by myself as much as possible, but I have had no previous mechanical experience. I am, however, learning a lot from this forum everyday. Could you please tell me, when you say the slow jet was clogged, do you mean the tiny holes along the narrower cylinder part, or is there a larger hole at the tip (I couldn't tell from the side-view)? And how did you clean it? Thanks again for the excellent labelled photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the detailed post, bikelearner. I am a new owner/rider who wants to maintain my bike by myself as much as possible, but I have had no previous mechanical experience. I am, however, learning a lot from this forum everyday. Could you please tell me, when you say the slow jet was clogged, do you mean the tiny holes along the narrower cylinder part, or is there a larger hole at the tip (I couldn't tell from the side-view)? And how did you clean it? Thanks again for the excellent labelled photos.
Assuming the slowjet is a cylinder, I am referring to the central "pipe" going from one end to the other. This was clogged. Fuel moves from the float chamber to the main carb chamber along this pipe. The four holes visible on the curved part of the cylinder is where the vaporized fuel goes into the main carb chamber. There are actually four more holes, on opposite sides of the curved part of the cylinder. These eight holes were not clogged.

I used a fishing line to clean all holes in all the jets, though all the holes seemed clean. Before the cleaning, I sprayed CRC Clean-R-Carb carb cleaner on all the parts, and let the jets sit in a small puddle of carb cleaner for 15 minutes.

I have not shown all details because others in the forum have explained how to disassemble a carb.

As you disassemble, take photographs. Label screws, tubes etc. It is amazing how fast we forget what screw goes where and which hose connects to what nipple when you are new to this. Ideally you should be able to check out another similar bike if required (I did not have access to another bike).

Use good quality tools and properly fitting Phillips screwdrivers and hex sockets. Else you can strip and mar the finish of the screws and bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sweet bike, how do you keep it so nice and shiny?!

The bike has only 600 miles now. I bought it at around 300 miles. The bike is of year 2009, yet hardly used. The previous owner and myself kept/keep it garaged. I would say, wax it every year and the colors will not fade soon.

My original point was, the bike looks new, yet it had a carb issue.
 

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Great post. I have had problems cleaning carbs over the years and have never been able to clean a badly clogged jet with liquid cleaner and, or compressed air. What really works good are a set of welding tip cleaners sold by the NAPA stores, part # 777-1420. They are very strong and come as a set of about 12 different sizes for about $7. These tip cleaners can also be used to enlarge a jet slightly. They really heped me unclog a CB 100 carb that had jets plugged with a material that felt like cement from over 20 years of storage. I also used the set to enlarge my 250 Nighthawk jets enough so that it does not run lean anymore. The cleaners are like small files, some as small as a needle.
 

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Good tip on the tip cleaners, Bianchi. I used those on cutting torches back when I worked in a metal shop a million years ago. Just have to have a very light touch or you will enlarge the jets, like you say.
 

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That's the cleanest carb, i have ever seen, i'm so surprise, you had a carb issue, i'm not happy about it, but, i sure am glad you posted such detailed photos great job ! i doing the same thing i had a few set backs, bent a spring and screw, but i cant wait to get it up and hear and feel the difference in the performance afterwards ! safe riding !
 

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Great post. I have had problems cleaning carbs over the years and have never been able to clean a badly clogged jet with liquid cleaner and, or compressed air. What really works good are a set of welding tip cleaners sold by the NAPA stores, part # 777-1420. They are very strong and come as a set of about 12 different sizes for about $7. These tip cleaners can also be used to enlarge a jet slightly. They really heped me unclog a CB 100 carb that had jets plugged with a material that felt like cement from over 20 years of storage. I also used the set to enlarge my 250 Nighthawk jets enough so that it does not run lean anymore. The cleaners are like small files, some as small as a needle.

I had that same cement type stuff. Following a tip I read on the internet I used a 10 minute lemon juice bath that dissolved it and left the jets shiny.
 

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I don't recommend putting any steel wire, rod, or round file, which is what welding tip nozzle cleaners are, in any carb part. Soaking the parts in Berryman's Chem Dip for an extended period (24-48 hours) will dissolve all varnish and other deposits with no danger of ruining a jet.
 

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Does anyone have a detailed picture, and/or instructions on where the fuel lines are connected on 1986 Honda Rebel CMX250? Putting one back together, starts, but will not run...thinking it may be a misconnected fuel line. TIA
 

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The routing for your carb is similar except that there is a brass nipple towards the top of the carb that goes to the carbon cannister. It has an arrow going to it labeled as F29 in this diagram.
There are two F29s in the diagram; it's the uppermost F29. 2009 Honda CMX250C AC CARBURETOR | Cheap Cycle Parts

If you want to bypass the cannister, just cap off that nipple.
 
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