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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a used 2001 Honda Rebel 250. If I leave it sitting for a 5 days or so the bike no longer starts. The battery is fairly new and the previous owner (a friend) claims she had no problems with it. If I hook it up to a trickle charger and then use it every day then it starts fine. I do park it on the streets of San Francisco and I know it's been dropped or something because I already had to replace a side mirror which went missing one day.

But my question is what are the various things I should check to diagnose what's draining the battery? A friend said to just start sticking a voltmeter on all the wires to see if something is pulling power. But that's not very helpful because I'm not mechanical at all so I have no idea how to get to the exposed wires. Is there any other possible problems?

Thanks.
 

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What kind of battery (brand) and how old?
 

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I had a friend with the same problem. I told him his battery was bad. He had it checked and I was confirmed to be correct. Have your battery checked. By the way his was a 2009 model Rebel, with less than 5,000 miles on it. My $.02 worth.
Gary
 

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The batteries do go bad with all the vibration and charge, discharge situations that occur. I'm seriously looking into placing some gel pad/pads beneath my battery. The kind designed for marine applications. Might be overkill but it can't hurt.
 

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what are your riding habits? lots of short trips at low rpm or high revving long trips?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What kind of battery (brand) and how old?
It's a megaboost. I don't know exactly, but it's probably less than a year old. The previous owner had recently replaced it. I did accidentally leaving the ignition on all night when I first got it and the battery got really low but I charged it back up. I'm not sure if that can ruin the battery.

So it sounds like I should check the battery itself first? Are there any other possible things that might drain the battery. Might it just be fluid level in the battery.

I got the bike very recently and I'm still learning so just riding around San Francisco.
 

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Once a battery has been deeply discharged, odds are its a goner.
 

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Gman, I see three posts by you in this thread. There are the two listed and the third about a missing post. I see no deletions or edits.
It might have been a transmission glitch or software hiccup but certainly no punitive actions has been taken.



I had a friend with the same problem. I told him his battery was bad. He had it checked and I was confirmed to be correct. Have your battery checked. By the way his was a 2009 model Rebel, with less than 5,000 miles on it. My $.02 worth.
Gary
The batteries do go bad with all the vibration and charge, discharge situations that occur. I'm seriously looking into placing some gel pad/pads beneath my battery. The kind designed for marine applications. Might be overkill but it can't hurt.
 

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I'll bet the old battery was made in China. If you get a new battery, a Yuasa AGM is a very good battery and what was OEM equipment in your bike.
 

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i had some seriouse battery issues when i first got my bike and was also told it was a new er battery it fired right up for test ride and all came home with it and after the first week nothing but problems if it sat for any leangth of time it was dead as a door nail alot of folks on here told me to get it tested and or get a new one after 2 months of messing with it i finally opted to get a new one at least then id know for a fact that its new and not just taking someone on there word who was trying to make a sale ...soon as i got the new battery got its first full charge man i have been having the time of my life not a single issue i ussually keep the bike on the charger when not in use but for the last 2 weeks i got a bit lazy and didnt bother i went out today and she fired right off and did just fine not a single problem ....id say just to save you some time and frustrations by you a new battery so you for a fact know its new and will not be giving you issues if it still happenes after that then something else needs to be addressed but atleast you know you have a good battery for when its fixed ....on another note when i took my battery in what i thought was the original stock battery turned out to be a frickin lown mower battery that came from wal-mart but i didnt know any better at the time lol
 

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Sometimes if you accidently leave a light on all night - you've basically killed your battery. I've done this twice.

I get my batteries from the Battery Plus store - they have USA ones ready to go - and what a difference they have made. Same as Shadowrider - no problems. The ones made in China are pretty cheap and die after a year or so. I will only buy US made batteries.

The great thing about the Rebel is it is so easy to change the battery on them. Really, if this lady can do it, anyone can.
 

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Wet Cell batteries are really simple chemical reactors. Lead plates, lead oxide and electrolyte solution create the reaction. Over time the acid will "wear out", meaning it has given all of it's electrons to the lead plate and becomes unable to regenerate.

A lot of things determine how long a wet cell battery will last. Heat, Extreme Cold, over charging, vibration, closed circuits, etc. all play a part. Improper wiring, weak wiring and/or wire insulation, etc. that cause energy leaks can also cause deeper electrolyte loss.

Doing a Specific Gravity test on a wet cell battery can help to determine it a cell (a portion of the lead plates) has gone bad. One dead cell can result in the entire battery not being able to produce enough current.

Wet Cell batteries require maintenance (topping off electrolyte levels due to evaporation or other loss of liquid acid).

Safe to say that older batteries have less energy potential than a new one (fresh electrolytes and lead plates). Reducing the other factors can help give longer life to a wet cell.

Another alternative is AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat) or "sealed Battery" are basically the same as wet cell except the electrolyte is held by thin fiberglass mats. The advantage to these is they are virtually maintenance free.

Last, we now have Lithium Ion batteries that are much better in regards to size to power output ratio, maintenance free, not restricted to vertical placement, etc. Downside is the colder the temperature the harder it is for these to cycle enough power until they generate their own heat. They tend to recharge much quicker but can only do so for a set number of charge cycles (i.e. 1000 cycles)
 

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You may also check to make sure you battery cables are connected tightly and that they are clean.
If they cables are not making good contact it can take a toll on the battery
 

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I bet a dollar that you'll be happy with your Yuasa. That's what came stock on my '09 from the dealer, and it's still treating me great. When it goes, I plant to get another.
 
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