Honda Rebel 250 & 450 Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had my annual inspection done today on my 2005 Rebel 250, and found that the front tire has 2/32 left, back tire has 4/32, and brake pads have 2/32. The inspector passed it, but recommended replacement soon. (They don't offer any motorcycle servicing, except for state inspection, so don't have anything to gain.) I replaced the original tires with the same Bridgestone models as OEM three years ago, when I bought the bike with 9K miles on, as they were dry-rotted after 8 years in storage. The bike now has another 4K miles on it. (It's used only for three-season recreation.)

Am I doing something wrong to cause such rapid wear on the tires? I don't ride aggressively, or at high speed, and there is no damage. Should I be able to get another 700 miles safely before replacement? What tires would be a good buy right now, and do they need balanced? (I had these tires professionally installed and balanced.) Recommendations for new brake pads and shoes?

Will appreciate all comments and advice. Thanks for your help!
 

·
Premium Member
1985, 86 CMX250C, 81 CM200T, 74 CL360, Invisible to cages, treat them accordingly. Avoids Road RAGE!
Joined
·
3,161 Posts
There are a couple of us here that recommend Kenda tires. Kenda Cruiser and Kenda Challenger. One is for the front and one is for the rear. I usually get about 10,000 miles out of these tires, and they are excellent for gravel, if you travel and gravel roads at all. Pirelli is another good brand, and they last a little longer. But I prefer the Kendas.
I installed the Kendas myself pretty easily. The Pirelli rear tire was much harder, and without my daughter's help, I wouldn't have been able to do it anywhere near as easily.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,323 Posts
Prefer Pirelli, used Kendas the last two sets, none have required balancing. Mounted and removed them myself. Safety depends on road conditions. You can run bald tires on dry roads, but when it's wet, can cause a crash.

Never been a fan of Bridgestone.

Emgo and EBC make decent brake pads and shoes. Don't get the sintered/metallic pads, they increase the rate of rotor wear. IMO organic is better.
EMGO 1996-2002 CMX 250 C Rebel HONDA 93-39166 BRAKE SHOES W GROOVES 43120-429000 | eBay EBC Organic Brake Pads Honda CMX250C Rebel Hyosung GT650S Kymco Active SR 50 | eBay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There are a couple of us here that recommend Kenda tires. Kenda Cruiser and Kenda Challenger. One is for the front and one is for the rear. I usually get about 10,000 miles out of these tires, and they are excellent for gravel, if you travel and gravel roads at all. Pirelli is another good brand, and they last a little longer. But I prefer the Kendas.
I installed the Kendas myself pretty easily. The Pirelli rear tire was much harder, and without my daughter's help, I wouldn't have been able to do it anywhere near as easily.
Thanks, Emil.
Do you balance the wheels after fitting new tires?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Prefer Pirelli, used Kendas the last two sets, none have required balancing. Mounted and removed them myself. Safety depends on road conditions. You can run bald tires on dry roads, but when it's wet, can cause a crash.

Never been a fan of Bridgestone.

Emgo and EBC make decent brake pads and shoes. Don't get the sintered/metallic pads, they increase the rate of rotor wear. IMO organic is better.
EMGO 1996-2002 CMX 250 C Rebel HONDA 93-39166 BRAKE SHOES W GROOVES 43120-429000 | eBay EBC Organic Brake Pads Honda CMX250C Rebel Hyosung GT650S Kymco Active SR 50 | eBay
Thanks for the advice, Flite, and for the links! Any thoughts on why the original Bridgestones lasted 9K miles and still had plenty of tread (as well as dry rot), but the new ones, same model are close to worn out after only 4K miles?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,323 Posts
Not all that knowledgeable about tires but seems it would have to be different riding style, softer rubber, or both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not all that knowledgeable about tires but seems it would have to be different riding style, softer rubber, or both.
Thanks, again, Flite! Everybody seems to be talking about 7K to 15K on a front tire, but I'm not getting close to that, and as you probably remember, I'm not exactly a fast rider. not do I brake or corner hard. I have no complaints about the tire performance, but my expectation was far more miles. Maybe the good old L303 that came on the bike when new was vastly different from the L303 that I bought in 2019.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,323 Posts
Even with a Kenda up front, which has fairly soft rubber, I get around 12,000-14,000 miles from a tire. But I use engine braking whenever I can and stay off the front brake except when needed. I'm sure this contributes to wear on the rear tire which doesn't last nearly as long as the front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
I am about to fit my 2nd Shinko on the back. It lasted 2 years / 8k miles. I find it's got good grip, except when it's colder than 40F and lasts a long time. Prior to that I had a Pirelli on the back and got about half that in time/mileage.

I always use Pirelli on the front.
I put some ceramic pads on the front about 12k miles ago, don't remember the brand though. Still going.
 
  • Like
Reactions: markwilliamson

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Even with a Kenda up front, which has fairly soft rubber, I get around 12,000-14,000 miles from a tire. But I use engine braking whenever I can and stay off the front brake except when needed. I'm sure this contributes to wear on the rear tire which doesn't last nearly as long as the front.
Thanks, Flite & Leebrown66,

After 3 years and 4,000 miles, my front tire has 2/32 left (which is arguably when it needs replaced), and the rear tire has 4/32, which I think is about 50%. So it looks like I could get 7,000 or 8,000 on the rear, and have got half of that on the front. I do tend to use the front brake more for stopping than the rear or the engine, so maybe I need to change that habit.

I'd like to move to the fatter 100/90-18 front tire that's available with the Dunlop 404. In your judgement, could I run that with the half-worn Bridgestone G508 (same as original OEM) rear, or should I discard that, and use the matching 404 tire on the rear also.

I have liked the idea of keeping to the original tires, and the appearance of a good chunky tread with those Bridgestones, but the reality of changing a tire after 4,000 miles has been shocking to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Before placing an order for new Dunlop front tire, I thought I'd just do a "sanity" check. I invested all of $4 in a neat little tire depth gage. (I know that's more expensive than using a 1 cent piece, but hey, I gotta have the toys!)

Checked the front tire, and as expected (I don't lean my Rebel enough) most of the wear was on the center, and the last 1/2" of the outer tread was pristine. I measured carefully in several places, and found that in the center the shallowest tread that I could find was just about 2/32". The deepest tread I could find on the outer edge was 4/32".

That surprised me, and I checked the specs... yes, Bridgestone says the deepest tread of the L303 should be 4/32"! In contrast, Dunlop says the deepest tread of the D404 (my choice for a replacement) should be 6/32"!

Not relevant for now, because I'm going to run the rear tire a little longer, for sure, but on the rear tire the deepest untouched tread I could find on the edge was 5/32", and the most worn was 4/32", but Bridgestone claims 10/32" when new. I'll check my measurement again, to make sure I got that right.

So, again, I'm on the fence about replacing that front tire. After 3 years and 4,000 miles it's down from (perhaps) 4/32 to 2/32. Logic tells me that it's got at least another 1,000 miles in it. Maybe more? Pictures are attached. What would you do? I've got 10 days before I need to be in southern Ohio to ride maybe 600 or 700 miles.

Thanks again for your advice!
Automotive tire Tread Wood Synthetic rubber Tints and shades

Finger Nail Thumb Wrist Foot
Automotive parking light Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread
Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Wrist
Automotive tire Tread Wood Synthetic rubber Tints and shades
Finger Nail Thumb Wrist Foot

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Wrist

Automotive parking light Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread
 

·
Super Moderator
1987 CMX250C AC
Joined
·
3,387 Posts
I'd be looking for wheel weights bought the last time tires were changed..
Definitely time to replace imo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'd be looking for wheel weights bought the last time tires were changed..
Definitely time to replace imo
The wheel weights were new 3 years ago. Is that all they're good for? They're the type that clips on to the spokes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the great advice. At this point, just a week away from the Ohio Rebel gathering at Lake Hope, I've decide to leave the rear end alone, since that tire has some life left in it yet, and concentrate on the front.

I have ordered EBC organic brake pads (as recommended by Flite), together with a Dunlop D404 100/90-18 front tire (as used by Jim Wilson... I really wanted to try that, and it's got 6/32 of tread compared to the Bridgestone's 4/32), and a wheel balancing beads kit. Hopefully, I can get those installed, and my oil changed to Rotella 15w40 during the next week! I already had a new rim band sitting here, and I changed the tube 12 months ago, so I'm going to use them.

Thanks, again, and I'll let you know how it all works out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Replaced the 20 years old tires on my recent acquisition with Dunlop 404s'. Seems a good tire for light bikes. Around 400 lb and down. I would not put them on the 600 lb PC800 though. The rear Chingshin still looked good but the front was scary cracked.

Another thing is places that seldom inspect bikes might use the tread depth standards for cars and the spec might be different in the state regs.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top