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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-07-2018 01:34 AM
abnormalspring
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckster View Post
Its much better for a beginner to start out on a lightweight low powered bike like the Rebel. These are very forgiving if you make a mistake, and are not fast enough to get a newbie into trouble before they have time to realize what's happening. I always cringe when we get a class with an 18 year old who has a liter sport bike at home waiting for him to get a licence.
Having said that, the Rebel is physically small for a 6 footer. A dual sport 250 or 450 is physically more suitable for a bigger person, and that type of bike is still a great trainer, and great fun to ride.
Lots of people nowadays start out on bigger bikes, even buying their dream Harley as a first bike. I think these folks miss out on a lot by never having the fun of riding a lightweight bike that they can thrash hard without worries. It's true that its much more fun to ride a slow bike fast than to ride a fast bike slow. People that start out on big fast bikes often take a long time to really get a good feel for riding because they are intimidated by the power and weight. If they are not intimidated by the power and weight, some of them come to grief in an accident because of their lack of respect for the bike.

I rolled my 650 triumph up onto the bike lift to do some work on it today, and marvelled at how light and easy it is to roll around. At 375 pounds and 49 horsepower, it would be considered a beginner bike today, but back in 1968 when it was new, it was a fire breathing "big bike" . It was nearly as fast as anything else you could buy back then reputed to be capable of 120 MPH. (hence the model designation T120R) Mine will never get anywhere close to that speed again.
Modern bikes are much better in every way than the old timers, but the old ones do have their nostalgic charms. Its amazing how much power and speed is available today compared to what was possible 50 years ago. To see beginners start out on one of these machines makes me wonder how I would have done had I not gone through the progression of small bikes that I learned on so long ago.

agreed my first bike was a GSXR1000 would really like to get another. I remember the day I realized that it was to much bike. I was sitting there and thought to myself OH HERE WE GO as the handlebars locked to the right idk what happend to cause it but then moments later I was about 300ft from the bike. I was lucky as I was going about 60MPH and did a wheelie on wet grass at the campground coming down was rough. probably didnt get hurt as i had been drinking and was so slow to react.



But that bike got sold to pay the fines it got me and years later i got the rebel that i like tearing up the town on it like its a liter bike
07-27-2018 10:06 AM
kryton
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadow Shack View Post
Until you hit the traffic jam. Even without lane splitting, a Rebel can really thread the needle when it comes to heavy traffic. I've ditched many a Euro-supercar with a 16-pony Rebel in the thick downtown Vegas traffic jams.
Maybe it's because I've only been riding 2 years, or that I'm overly paranoid about being invisible to cages and getting stepped on, especially in the pre-dawn-darkness commute in heavy traffic on the interstate, or that the Rebel's acceleration from 55-65 in 12.987 seconds leaves me over-caution about changing lanes with less than a half-mile back to the next car..or that I leave extra space in my following distance to allow extra time to react to the idiots on the interstate and continuously have to back off more when the next cage takes advantage of that and cuts in front of me, or that I'm suffering the indignities of old age and have to stop every 45 minutes to walk off the developing numbness/tingling in the arms and legs, but I find that any highway/interstate travel takes me longer on 2 wheels than 4...
carn sarn it !
07-27-2018 06:56 AM
Duckster
Quote:
Originally Posted by flitecontrol View Post
My Rebel stops quickly, but my wife's Corolla will out accelerate it at just about any speed!
Yeah, I guess I was thinking more about the BMW K bike than the Rebel..
07-27-2018 06:53 AM
Fridgitator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadow Shack View Post
Until you hit the traffic jam. Even without lane splitting, a Rebel can really thread the needle when it comes to heavy traffic. I've ditched many a Euro-supercar with a 16-pony Rebel in the thick downtown Vegas traffic jams.


Of course the statute of limitations is expired by decades, and I've grown up almost half that much, but I once evaded a squad car while riding a Puch moped with a maximum speed of about twenty five MPH. I sold it shortly thereafter. Too small a town to do that more than once.
07-27-2018 06:46 AM
Shadow Shack
Quote:
Originally Posted by flitecontrol View Post
My Rebel stops quickly, but my wife's Corolla will out accelerate it at just about any speed!
Until you hit the traffic jam. Even without lane splitting, a Rebel can really thread the needle when it comes to heavy traffic. I've ditched many a Euro-supercar with a 16-pony Rebel in the thick downtown Vegas traffic jams.
07-27-2018 06:17 AM
flitecontrol
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckster View Post
I find its always quicker to go anywhere on a bike just because the bike is more nimble in traffic and can change speeds up or down much quicker than a car.
My Rebel stops quickly, but my wife's Corolla will out accelerate it at just about any speed!
07-26-2018 11:19 AM
Duckster I have to agree with Shack on that.. You should never be in so much of a hurry that you take unwise chances whether on a bike or in a car. Having said that, I find its always quicker to go anywhere on a bike just because the bike is more nimble in traffic and can change speeds up or down much quicker than a car.
07-26-2018 10:43 AM
Shadow Shack
Quote:
Originally Posted by kryton View Post

"I'm never in a hurry on 2 wheels, I'll get there when I get there. If I can't adhere to that then I shouldn't be on 2 wheels, take the car instead"
...because you can cause a lot more damage that way.

Seriously though, one should have the same mindset regardless of how many wheels are underneath them.
07-26-2018 09:18 AM
Lisa1958 "I'm never in a hurry on 2 wheels, I'll get there when I get there. If I can't adhere to that then I shouldn't be on 2 wheels, take the car instead"

I like that kryton. I just hope you realize the gratitude from your students that I have for my instructors. They were thorough, detailed, patient and on occasion very funny. I really felt their passion for their job. So for all the students who don't get to thank you I will. THANK YOU!!!

🙂 I'm seriously not as dorky as I sound. (OK I am)
07-26-2018 07:36 AM
kryton Glad to hear its going so well Lisa.
Love the list, I have a pre-ride mantra you might want to add ...


"I'm never in a hurry on 2 wheels, I'll get there when I get there. If I can't adhere to that then I shouldn't be on 2 wheels, take the car instead"
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