2007 Honda Rebel 250 charging system problem, need help! - Honda Rebel Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 08-18-2015, 04:49 AM Thread Starter
 
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Question 2007 Honda Rebel 250 charging system problem, need help!

On my 2007 Honda Rebel. The same day I bought it, after riding it for approximately 40-50 miles, the battery went dead. It was after about 5 starts ups. Took the battery out, had a deep charge done, and had it tested by Autozone and my local dealer (under load), and it tested good both times. Put the battery back in and used a volt-a-meter to test the charging system and it was putting out 12.7 volts at idle & 14.2 volts with throttle at the battery. I then ran it with the good battery for about 5 days, right about 50-60 miles for about 3 days of riding and about 6 or 7 start ups. Now the battery is dead again right after a 15 mile highway ride. I came home after about 15 miles on the highway, shut it off, made a phone call, went to restart it after about 5 minutes and the battery is dead again. I made sure all the connections were tight and they were. Do you guys think the battery is bad despite testing good, or that something is wrong with the charging system? I'm on a low monthly fixed income and can not afford the $75 an hour, just to have it looked at to find the problem, that the shop wants.

Tim - Proud owner 2007 Honda CMX250C Rebel & 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500
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post #2 of 6 Old 08-18-2015, 06:07 AM
 
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I stole this from a different forum but it was written by our very own Duckster :

The Battery charge condition won't affect the output of the alternator/rectifier.
You can test the combination by measuring voltage at the battery as you already did. It should be 13-14 voltsDC or so when the engine is revved up. It Seems you had a momentary 13 volts and then down to 11.
If you don't see the voltage rise when the engine revs, it could be either the alternator or the rectifier.
To test which, you need to get at the alternator leads while the engine is running.
There are 3 yellow wires coming from the alternator to the rectifier in one connector. Pull this connector apart and try to measure the AC volts between any 2 of the 3 leads. It will be 19 or 20 volts AC (or something like that) The voltage should be the same between any 2 of the 3 wires. If the AC voltage is there, the alternator is OK and its the rectifier.

hope it helps

86 Honda cmx450
82 Honda cb450
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post #3 of 6 Old 08-18-2015, 06:23 AM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantmotw View Post
Seems you had a momentary 13 volts and then down to 11.
Not sure how you came up with that. I had a steady 12.7 volts at idle & steady 14.2 volts revving the motor. Which from what I understand should mean the stator & regulator/rectifier is putting out fine. Am I wrong?

Tim - Proud owner 2007 Honda CMX250C Rebel & 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500
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post #4 of 6 Old 08-18-2015, 07:54 AM
 
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Nope your right on the money, only other thing it could be is a leech somewhere. As i said this was posted elsewhere, but the basic idea is the same on how to test for problems charging.
you can also install the battery turn your high beams on for 3-5seconds to take off the static head and that should let you know more about your battery situation.

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post #5 of 6 Old 08-18-2015, 08:02 AM Thread Starter
 
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OK thank you. Is there a way to test for a leech without having a test light?

Tim - Proud owner 2007 Honda CMX250C Rebel & 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1500
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post #6 of 6 Old 08-18-2015, 08:22 AM
 
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To check if something is draining your battery while your bike is turned off you need to test for current, not volts. To do so, do the following: Switch your Digial Multimeter to DC AMPs. Amps is usually indicated by an "A" on the Multimeter Switch. AC is usually shown as a "~" symbol and DC shown as a "-" symbol. You usually have to move the Multimeter positive lead to a separate socket on the Multimeter. Sometimes there are 2 sockets, a high range and a low range. Always test on the highest setting first. For example: high setting on your multimeter may be 10 Amp. Test on the 10 Amp setting first, then if the current drawn is less than your Multimeter Low setting, move to that setting and keep testing. In my example my Multimeter low setting is 0.3 Amps. Also indicated as 300mA (mA x 1000 = A). WARNING! Once the multimeter is on Amps do not connect it directly across the battery and do not hit the starter button while testing for current Amps. This will cause the internal fuse in the multimeter to blow! A multimeter set on current is a very low resistance, almost a short circuit and will draw as much current as your battery will supply till something melts. Always plug the Multimeter leads back to volts when you have finished testing to avoid blowing the fuse next time you use your multimeter. To test for battery drain: Switch everything off on the bike. Disconnect just one battery lead. For example disconnect the Positive Battery Lead. Set your Multimeter to Amps as described above. Connect the Positive Multimeter Lead to the Battery Positive terminal. Make sure the Positive Lead you removed from the battery does not touch anything grounded, like the Bike frame etc…. Connect the Negative Lead from the Multimeter to the Positive Lead you removed from the Battery. You should now see current drain measured in Amps. Move to the lower Amp setting on your multimeter if the current is lower than the setting on the Multimeter Low setting. Start to unplug the wires or fuses around your bike and see if the current reading goes to zero. This will point you in the direction of the current thief. You can convert to Power measured in Watts by multiplying it by the Battery Voltage. Power = Volts x Amps 4.2Watts or (12Volts x 0.35Amps). - See more at: BatteryStuff Articles | How to Test a Battery for Parasitic Drain

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