Front end swap, Rebel to Twinstar.. - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #1 of 36 Old 11-27-2018, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
 
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Front end swap, Rebel to Twinstar..

Well, the grand plan is to put a Rebel CMX250 front end on a Twinstar CM200t.
Reasons: I'd like a disc brake and better choice of front tires.
There are a number of concerns and I'm tiring to work them out.
I can only guess that the front end I'm looking at is an earlier one. There are no reflectors on the struts, the brake caliper is on the right side (looking at the bike head on). How can I determine the year?
Neck bearings, will the Rebel bearing be a direct swap?
I want to rebuild the brake cylinder and caliper, do they differ from year to year?
What about the wheel bearings, do they differ from year to year?
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post #2 of 36 Old 11-27-2018, 06:00 PM
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brake disc on right head on is what we usually call left - from the riders perspective

that's a 1996 - 2016 model - the year would be on the VIN plate at the front of the frame

it's a different setup than the 1985 - 1987 Rebel which had the disc on the right (left head on)

everything should be interchangeable if you stay within the same generation

1985 Rebel 250 ... 2005 Ruckus 50
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post #3 of 36 Old 11-27-2018, 08:37 PM
 
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Just for future reference, the left side of a bike is to your left when sitting on the bike.
kryton and Nardospark like this.

2004 Rebel 250, 2003 BMW K1200GT (roadburner), 2004 BMW R1200GS(all purpose),
1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
1968 Triumph Bonneville
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post #4 of 36 Old 12-21-2018, 10:51 AM Thread Starter
 
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Small progress update. I've rebuilt the master cylinder and caliper, neither were overly difficult to do. Sight glass on the master cylinder was a bit of hassle, finally pressed it in using a vise.
At this point I'm trying to figure out what handle bar switches and cables I can swap over to the Twinstar. The master cylinder is a no brainier, with a small rewire job for the brake light switch. Choke and throttle cables are going to require modification(s). Rebel choke cable has extremely small ends and a spring. Don't know if I'll need the spring for the handle mount choke. Throttle cable needs some more thought.
Might just stick with the Twinstar controls and figure out a re-location for the pull choke..

1980 Twinstar CM200T
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post #5 of 36 Old 12-23-2018, 10:18 AM Thread Starter
 
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Wheel bearings replaced. I went to a local Bike Shop to have them pulled because I couldn't get the old ones out. Cost me $20, figured it was cheaper than a tool I'd use once or twice. Fork and dust seals replaced. Still working on a fix for the choke.

1980 Twinstar CM200T
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post #6 of 36 Old 12-23-2018, 11:27 AM
 
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Wheel bearings typically just need to be driven out with a drift of some kind. A cold chisel will work, as will an appropriately sized bolt.
The first one is the hardest because you have to drop that spacer sleeve in the hub a little to expose the inner race on the far side. Then you get your drift on it and give it couple of good shots with a hammer to start it out. If you don't like so much violence, You could apply some heat to the hub to make the bearing come loose easier. Work around the inside of the bearing to drive it out evenly.
Placing the new bearings in the freezer and heating the hub makes putting the new ones in pretty easy. Don't forget the spacer between the 2 bearings though.

2004 Rebel 250, 2003 BMW K1200GT (roadburner), 2004 BMW R1200GS(all purpose),
1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
1968 Triumph Bonneville
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post #7 of 36 Old 12-24-2018, 10:39 AM Thread Starter
 
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Duckster; while your advice is all very good and sound in practice.. Getting the collar (spacer) moved enough to get any kind of a workable gap was a no go. Heat didn't help. I couldn't get a grip on anything that would pull out.
Having looked at a small number of bearing pullers that "might" work, I opted to take it to a shop. A $20 investment was the cheaper solution in my case. I'm not one to give up easy, but this bearing replacement was a head ache.

1980 Twinstar CM200T
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post #8 of 36 Old 12-24-2018, 01:46 PM
 
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I suspect the shop did what I have done in the past, just dropped the spacer enough to expose a lip on the bearing inner race (by drifting it down)and then drifting the bearing out from the opposite side. For 20 bucks at a shop it must have just taken them a couple of minutes.

2004 Rebel 250, 2003 BMW K1200GT (roadburner), 2004 BMW R1200GS(all purpose),
1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
1968 Triumph Bonneville
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post #9 of 36 Old 12-24-2018, 02:40 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckster View Post
I suspect the shop did what I have done in the past, just dropped the spacer enough to expose a lip on the bearing inner race (by drifting it down)and then drifting the bearing out from the opposite side. For 20 bucks at a shop it must have just taken them a couple of minutes.
Looks that way from the marks left inside the spacer. Don't know, I didn't watch them do it. Yeah, this shop gets $95 an hour labor rate. So 15 mins. work would be roughly $23.75, lol.

1980 Twinstar CM200T
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post #10 of 36 Old 12-26-2018, 08:59 PM
 
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Just like a car, the right and left sides of a motorcycle are from the riders perspective while sitting on the seat. The brake lever is on the right side, the clutch is on the left. Early model Rebels had the reflectors on the forks. Or rather "in" the forks. There was a place cast into the forks for the reflectors. That made removing the reflectors very difficult, because you actually had to grind that area down after removing the reflectors, then refinish the forks. Newer Rebels have the reflectors on the front downtube, making them easy to repair. I have always removed the reflectors from bikes if possible.

So anyway, if there are no reflectors on the forks, you probably have later model forks. I actually prefer drum brakes on the front of lightweight bikes just for their looks. I wish it were possible to put a Nighthawk 250 front wheel on a Rebel.
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cm/cmx front end swap, front end swap cmx/cm, rebel front end on cm250

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