Really cleaned the chain - Page 2 - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #11 of 26 Old 10-22-2018, 12:51 PM
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I'm not familiar with the product you used to lube the chain, but since it has "Tac" in its name, I would assume it being tacky is normal.

Regarding chain wear, when trying to pull the chain backwards on the rear sprocket, if it moves more than about 1/8", the chain is worn. Be sure to have the correct amount of slack in the chain and adjust the rear brake linkage whenever the rear axle is moved forward or backward.

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post #12 of 26 Old 10-22-2018, 02:13 PM
 
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My method for cleaning chains is to use a rag DAMPENED with a solvent like kerosene or Varsol and rub the grime off the bottom run of chain or at the rear sprocket where it's easy to get at. I don't like soaking the chain and O rings with any kind of solvent since you definitely don't want solvent on the O rings.
As to the proper lube product, everyone has their preference, but I would not use a product that stays tacky. I think that would pick up any dust and grit the chain sees. My preference is for a product that dries to a waxy finish. I find these work well and stay on for a long time while not attracting dirt nearly as much as any oil or tacky product. Maxima Chain wax is what I prefer. There are, no doubt, other similar products that work well too.

A new chain and sprocket will fit so tight that you can't lift the chain away from the sprocket at all. If you can pull a chain roller out an eighth of an inch or better the chain is worn out, and should be replaced. Don't go by those marks on the swingarm.

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post #13 of 26 Old 10-22-2018, 02:49 PM
 
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From their website: Bel-Ray Blue Tac Chain Lube is a high-performance, fully synthetic chain lube for all powersports chain applications. .... offers an extremely tacky formula that will not fling off when used as directed. Professional racing teams and dyno tests have proven that even at speeds of 100 mph and up .... remains in place on your chain, providing the performance and protection you require.

Applications:
• All motorcycle and ATV chains including “O,” “X” and “Z” ring chains.
• Both street and off-road applications.
• “O” and “X” ring chains commonly found on racing kart applications

If it's on the interweb, it has to be true, right??

As for movement, it doesn't pull off much, I'll try again after work to see just how much. Here is a pic of the swingarm, which I only shows because it has obviously been moved back multiple times...

Also, the chain hasn't been replaced since I've owned it (15 years), but the bike only has 10,000 miles on it and this clearly isn't the original chain.
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post #14 of 26 Old 10-22-2018, 03:34 PM
 
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I'm sure Bel Ray thinks its a fine product, and being tacky, I wouldn't expect it to fling off easily like motor or gear oil would. Tacky also means like flypaper, everything that touches it will stick to it. To me this means dirty right away.
Your chain may have more than the stock 108 links which would account for the axle being so far back without a lot of chain wear. Certainly if that was the original chain the axle position alone would strongly suggest a worn out chain.
Its hard to tell from your pic, but it seems there might be some excessive wear on that sprocket. Can you post a bigger picture?

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post #15 of 26 Old 10-22-2018, 04:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckster View Post
Your chain may have more than the stock 108 links which would account for the axle being so far back without a lot of chain wear. Certainly if that was the original chain the axle position alone would strongly suggest a worn out chain.
Its hard to tell from your pic, but it seems there might be some excessive wear on that sprocket. Can you post a bigger picture?
Well, winter is coming fast so the next time it's too cold to ride, I'll grab a hot toddy and sit and count the links...

As for the sprocket, If you are looking at the approximate 7 or 8 o'clock position in the previous photo, I think the tips of the sprockets are in a shadow, making them look very worn. I thought they looked fine, but now looking closer at the below pic, is the wear on the sides (not the tips or in the valleys) also a problem? Here is a photo taken at the 9-11 o'clock position, and the wear is pretty consistent at this level all the way around. What do you think?
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post #16 of 26 Old 10-22-2018, 04:17 PM
 
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The teeth don't look bad in that photo, although the camera has a skewed view which makes it hard to judge. Excessive wear on the sides of the teeth is indicative of misalignment of the rear wheel.

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post #17 of 26 Old 10-22-2018, 04:53 PM
 
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Thanks, Duckster, I'll look closer when I get home (both sides) and post another pic if I think there may be an issue.

As for the tacky chain lube, I guess time will tell....


1986 Rebel 250 Limited Edition black/gold


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post #18 of 26 Old 10-23-2018, 07:35 AM
 
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Wear on the outside of the teeth for the rear wheel sprocket indicates the rear wheel is pointed left instead of straight ahead, the sides of the chain links scrape down the side of the tooth as it meshes instead of the tooth lined up in the middle of the link.

I wonder if the PO only used the left side to adjust chain tension instead of both sides evenly?

do the adjusters look even on both sides or is the left side adjusted farther back than the right?

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post #19 of 26 Old 11-10-2018, 09:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kryton View Post
I wonder if the PO only used the left side to adjust chain tension instead of both sides evenly?

do the adjusters look even on both sides or is the left side adjusted farther back than the right?
No, both sides are adjusted evenly.

Sorry about the delay in responding but it suddenly got cold here and I’m a wimp. First nice day, I’ll investigate further. In the meantime, he’s semi-winterized and hooked to a tender, waiting for me to give him a little attention when the sun next shines.


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post #20 of 26 Old 11-27-2018, 05:29 PM
 
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When the sun shines, look at the drive sprocket as well. I wound up changing mine at 15K miles to see how many miles I could get out of the DID, made in Thailand, chain that came kinked on the new bike.

BTW, I am currently at 18.1K miles on the OEM chain that was kinked when purchased, using automatic transmission fluid (ATF) as the (frequent) lubricant, applied with a sock top and using a nitrile glove.

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