Infamous Left Side Oil Leak - Exactly what parts do I need? - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 08-23-2019, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
 
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Infamous Left Side Oil Leak - Exactly what parts do I need?

I picked up a 2006 Rebel 250 for my girlfriend to learn to ride on, but it had a few issues when I rode it home. It stalled on idle when hot (I've since rebuilt the carb, so that should be fixed).

The issue I want to solve now is the infamous left-side oil leak. The bike was owned by an 80 year old man, which I thought was a good thing, but in hindsight it probably means he neglected all maintenance.
I haven't checked the puke tube yet, but I'm sure it's full, and I assume the crankshaft seal is blown out. On the ride home, a bunch of oil sprayed out the left side of the bike, onto the exhaust pipe and my leg.

__________________________________________________ ______________________

I'm trying to figure out what parts I need to order to replace the crankshaft seal. The parts I know I need are:

Crankshaft Seal: 91201-402-015
Flywheel Seal: 91205-965-003
Flywheel Puller: Motion Pro 08-0027 Flywheel Puller M16X1.5 R.H.

What I'm confused about is the gaskets for the Stator Cover. Do I even need to replace those?
Inner Gasket: 11394-KBG-772
Outer Gasket: 11395-KBG-772

And I've seen that some people use Red RTV on the outside of the crankshaft seal, and one person on YouTube used Red Locktite. What's the best idea here?
And last thing, is it safe to use an air impact gun with that flywheel puller bolt? I won't damage the end of the crankshaft will I?

2009 Kawasaki Ninja 650R (Mine)
2006 Honda Rebel 250 (My Wonderful Girlfriend's)
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-23-2019, 04:23 PM
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The left side crankcase cover is dry, so a replacement outer gasket isn't required. If you removed the old gasket, I'd install a replacement just to keep the aluminum surfaces from making contact. If the old one is torn, it can still be used. Never been far enough inside the engine to say about the inner gasket.

On the flywheel remover bolt, it's recommended to snug it up, then rap the head sharply with a hammer. If that doesn't do it, repeat until it does.

You can probably get the crankcase seal cheaper at a local parts place. Just give them the dimensions (35X52X7mm) and they should be able to provide one.

Keepin' all the left over parts. Gonna use 'em to build another bike!

'01 & '09 Rebel 250, '06 Ninja 250, '89 VN 750
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post #3 of 18 Old 08-24-2019, 11:40 AM
 
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I wouldn't recommend RTV or Locktite on those seals. The other side of those is moving engine components, even a little bit of that stuff getting over there could be quite bad for the engine. Just clean the surfaces and put in the seals carefully. Don't go in too far with the large one, I use a 1x4 and make it slightly farther in from the embossed ring around the seal area, making sure it's evenly in around. With the seal off before installing, notice the bearings visible, don't want to push it into those.

I'm convinced this seal is actually designed to pop out if there's overpressure in the crankcase from too much oil or venting issues, thus the reason for the weep hole right below this seal. Something that may have happened in your case is fuel in the oil causing an overfill condition (I recommend always turning off the petcock as a habit), or another common mistake is to fill the oil to the top of the cross hatches when changing oil; this is too much oil when the engine warms up and blows out the seal for many.

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post #4 of 18 Old 08-24-2019, 12:16 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Lexiyntax View Post
I wouldn't recommend RTV or Locktite on those seals. The other side of those is moving engine components, even a little bit of that stuff getting over there could be quite bad for the engine. Just clean the surfaces and put in the seals carefully. Don't go in too far with the large one, I use a 1x4 and make it slightly farther in from the embossed ring around the seal area, making sure it's evenly in around. With the seal off before installing, notice the bearings visible, don't want to push it into those.

I'm convinced this seal is actually designed to pop out if there's overpressure in the crankcase from too much oil or venting issues, thus the reason for the weep hole right below this seal. Something that may have happened in your case is fuel in the oil causing an overfill condition (I recommend always turning off the petcock as a habit), or another common mistake is to fill the oil to the top of the cross hatches when changing oil; this is too much oil when the engine warms up and blows out the seal for many.
Got it, so no sealant, the seal itself can do the job just fine. So you're saying I shouldn't push the seal in until it "bottoms out" as others have suggested? Just until it's flush or slightly below flush?

I wouldn't doubt that, it seems like a good failsafe to have the seal blow instead of pressurizing the crankcase. When I checked the oil level, it did look way too high, so that's probably part of what blew it too.
To make sure I understand correctly, the procedure to fill with oil is hold the bike up level, fill with ~1.6qts of oil, rest the dip stick on the threads (DON'T screw it in) and check it that way?

2009 Kawasaki Ninja 650R (Mine)
2006 Honda Rebel 250 (My Wonderful Girlfriend's)
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post #5 of 18 Old 08-24-2019, 12:31 PM
 
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If others have had good success pushing it farther in, I won't argue the point, but I would rather have to put the seal back in than risk getting in contact with those bearings. Once the seal's entire side surface is flush against the metal all the way around, pushing it in farther isn't really gaining anything.

I don't recommend putting the full 1.6 quarts in; I put in closer to 1.4 then ride it around a hundred miles or so (for me this is one trip to work and back), then check it again hot. I used to be one of those paranoid 'oil to the top of the hatches every ride' and it never caused anything but problems and worry. This bike is fine as long as there's oil on the dipstick, I never fill over 3/4 of the way up the hatches, and ever since starting that procedure I haven't had the seal come out. I don't add until it's down below half or even a quarter on the dipstick; this engine hates overfill.

If you're not checking your tires more often than your oil, you're doing it wrong.

2008 Rebel 250, 2014 Street Triple, 2012 Voyager 1700, 2014 FLD Switchback, 2017 Guzzi V9, 2017 Concours 14
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post #6 of 18 Old 08-24-2019, 12:36 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Lexiyntax View Post
I don't recommend putting the full 1.6 quarts in; I put in closer to 1.4 then ride it around a hundred miles or so (for me this is one trip to work and back), then check it again hot. I used to be one of those paranoid 'oil to the top of the hatches every ride' and it never caused anything but problems and worry. This bike is fine as long as there's oil on the dipstick, I never fill over 3/4 of the way up the hatches, and ever since starting that procedure I haven't had the seal come out. I don't add until it's down below half or even a quarter on the dipstick; this engine hates overfill.

If you're not checking your tires more often than your oil, you're doing it wrong.
Gotcha. But you do check it with the bike level and the dipstick just resting, right?

Definitely a good point. I'll say I have a bad habit of not checking my tire condition and pressure, I'll have to teach my girlfriend to be better than me about that when she gets to start riding her Rebel!

2009 Kawasaki Ninja 650R (Mine)
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-24-2019, 12:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Jeremy1998 View Post
Gotcha. But you do check it with the bike level and the dipstick just resting, right?
That's correct, and I check it hot and cold to get a feel for the variance. I am convinced when it is at the top of the hatches when hot, that's when I lose the oil seal.

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Originally Posted by Jeremy1998 View Post
Definitely a good point. I'll say I have a bad habit of not checking my tire condition and pressure, I'll have to teach my girlfriend to be better than me about that when she gets to start riding her Rebel!
I think of it this way, if losing the engine, in most cases it will just lose power, at the worst you might have an exciting time until pulling in the clutch, but going down is unlikely. If losing a tire, going down is far more likely. Also after buying a few tires you're actually spending more than a replacement engine costs for this bike, so prioritizing optimizing tire life is more economical too.

2008 Rebel 250, 2014 Street Triple, 2012 Voyager 1700, 2014 FLD Switchback, 2017 Guzzi V9, 2017 Concours 14
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post #8 of 18 Old 08-30-2019, 07:20 PM Thread Starter
 
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Do you have a link for a holder to hold the flywheel when tightening the bolt? It seems that nobody local has anything to do the job, and the stupid strap wrench I got at Autozone snapped in 3 seconds.

2009 Kawasaki Ninja 650R (Mine)
2006 Honda Rebel 250 (My Wonderful Girlfriend's)
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post #9 of 18 Old 08-30-2019, 07:48 PM
 
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5th gear and stand on the brake?? just an idea..

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post #10 of 18 Old 08-30-2019, 08:51 PM
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I broke the transmission on my first Rebel trying to use that method (damn you, Clymers manual!). Call your local auto parts stores and see if they have a loaner flywheel holder that fits. Many stores loan tools at no cost.

Keepin' all the left over parts. Gonna use 'em to build another bike!

'01 & '09 Rebel 250, '06 Ninja 250, '89 VN 750
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