Looking at the 2016 Rebel 250 as my first motorcycle, how is it on the interstate? - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 07-19-2017, 12:03 AM Thread Starter
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Looking at the 2016 Rebel 250 as my first motorcycle, how is it on the interstate?

Good evening,

This is my first post here, but after looking around I doubt it'll be the last.

I grew up riding dirt bikes and such, but never thought about getting a bike until a few years ago. I took the class and have my motorcycle license, but for the past year I've just been driving around a scooter that was given to me. It's been fine for driving around my the small area I frequent, but now my job has me working an hour away. So I'm looking at finally upgrading.

During my class I practiced sitting on a Rebel and fell in love with it. I love the classic look and I'm a smaller guy so it just felt perfect sitting on it. So ever since then, this is the bike I've been planning on getting. My main concern is will a 250 be enough to handle interstates where the speed limit is 70 and 75 mph? My trip will be 75% interstate so I don't want to feel like a diesel will blow me off the road.

I'm just not certain if I should go with a 2016 250 or spend the extra money on the newer 300. Some professional advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you for your time.
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post #2 of 20 Old 07-19-2017, 06:10 AM
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Welcome to the forum! Opinions will vary but mine is that I wouldn't want to drive a Rebel at 70-75 mph for an hour twice a day. The bike can do it, no problem there. Getting blown off the road is not a problem if you know how to handle that situation. For me, the problem would be comfort. Vibrations from the engine would numb the nerves in my hands from that long a trip.

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post #3 of 20 Old 07-19-2017, 08:32 AM
 
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I try to ride my rebel several times a month to work, 70 miles each way, 90-120 minutes, about half on interstates and the rest on restricted access state highways with 55-60 speed limits. It has firmly convinced me that my next bike will be in the 700-1100 range.
Yes my rebel 250 can hold its own maintaining 70-80 on the interstate, but there is almost nothing left at the top end. When changing lanes you look for a bigger than normal space so you have time to match speed, cars on an entrance ramp that look like they are matching your position and your only choice is to slow down and let them ahead because you can't be sure you can speed up enough to get ahead of them a safe distance for them to merge in behind you, getting away from the pesky driver who insists on keeping their cage next to you or in each-other's blind spot...
I will be adding a windshield to my rebel soon, after more than an hour of my chest and arms being a drogue chute my hands get tired and I'm really hoping a windshield will improve that.
But I will be getting another bike with more power in the next year (or two depending on finances)


If you are serious about a rebel as your daily commuter and are considering the 300, labeled on this forum as a "not-a-rebel" I would suggest the 500 instead, and a windshield.
but that's just me and my experience, opinions will vary as @01-7700 said.

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post #4 of 20 Old 07-19-2017, 09:03 AM
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Welcome. As others have said, the Rebel 250 can travel at Interstate speeds, and I have done it for hours on end when I need to get from point A to B quickly. Passing others is rarely an issue, given the fact that most folks are travelling well above the speed limit. Riding in the right lane and letting traffic pass you is how I do it.

A good pair of riding gloves and a cramp buster go a long way toward easing hand issues. https://www.crampbuster.com/

I installed a windshield after my first Interstate ride, which was only a few miles. Won't ride a bike without one now. The stock seat is literally a PITA, especially for longer rides. Sending my seat to Spencer was an inexpensive way to vastly improve the seat. Spencers Seat Modifications - FAQ

Keepin' all the left over parts. Gonna use 'em to build another bike!

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post #5 of 20 Old 07-19-2017, 03:50 PM
 
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Being used to much bigger more powerful bikes, My perspective on the Rebel's highway performance might be a little biased against.
However, I'd say that it is remarkably capable for a 250. I find that holding on to the handlebars for support against the wind on the highway gets quite tiring after half an hour or so. Also at highway speed, the throttle is basically all used up, and its necessary to just hold it essentially wide open. I say essentially, because there's not much reaction to the last little bit of throttle, and I seldom have the throttle literally WFO, just nearly so on the highway.
To respond to the question asked, the 250 is a 40 year old design. It was already semi-obsolete even in 1985 when the first ones were built. The 300 is a brand new design with a modern engine. I have never ridden one, and I don't care for the fat tires and other design aspects, but I am pretty sure that the 300 would be much more capable on the highway, and if I had to pick one or the other I would opt for the 300
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post #6 of 20 Old 07-20-2017, 05:53 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for the replies. After reading all of your input, I think I be better off spending the extra money on the new 300. As much as I love the 250's design and feel, for the amount of time I'll be driving every day on the interstate with vehicles going 75-80 MPH, I just imagine I'll have a smoother/easier ride on the 300s. I do have awhile before I'm going to get a new bike, so I'll be looking into both extensively.

Thank you all for your time, I'm sure I'll be asking more questions soon as I want to make the best choice and get to know as much as possible about these awesome bikes.
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post #7 of 20 Old 07-20-2017, 06:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double J View Post
Thank you all for the replies. After reading all of your input, I think I be better off spending the extra money on the new 300. As much as I love the 250's design and feel, for the amount of time I'll be driving every day on the interstate with vehicles going 75-80 MPH, I just imagine I'll have a smoother/easier ride on the 300s. I do have awhile before I'm going to get a new bike, so I'll be looking into both extensively.

Thank you all for your time, I'm sure I'll be asking more questions soon as I want to make the best choice and get to know as much as possible about these awesome bikes.
There is another forum devoted to the 3rd generation Rebel 300 & 500 here: Honda Rebel 300 And 500 Forum

If you want to get advice from those who own them.

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post #8 of 20 Old 07-20-2017, 07:01 PM
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If you haven't looked at this thread from that forum, you need to before pulling the trigger on a 300. Top speed(Estimated) - Page 2 - Honda Rebel 300 & 500 Forum

The 250 does about the same, and for a lot less $$.

Keepin' all the left over parts. Gonna use 'em to build another bike!

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post #9 of 20 Old 07-20-2017, 09:37 PM
 
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Other bikes do it even better for less --- such as a 500 Vulcan, chain driven era 600/750 Shadows, Suzuki Savage/Boulevard S-40 & 800 Intruder, and 650 V-Star...all of which can easily be had for half the new price (which is the ONLY way you can buy it) of the 300 Not-Rebel.

"Ride Safe, Chop Safer" Motorcycles are not unsafe. However; they are extremely unforgiving of inattention, incompetence, ignorance, and stupidity.
Dismantling, sawzalling, and rattle canning does not make a bobber.
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post #10 of 20 Old 07-30-2017, 03:46 AM
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If you are worried about vibrations at highway speeds then forget the 300. It is a single cylinder and vibrates much worse than the parallel twin 250. Either bike will do the speed, but neither will be comfortable. They are great nimble bikes for around town, short rides, and occasional forays onto the interstates, but they are not meant for long or continuous highway riding. There are just much better options available.

The new 500 maybe acceptable, but the verdict is still out on it, and I would not buy any first year bike. I also think that 500 cc is still a little on the small side for mostly highway riding.

I would look for a Shadow or Vulcan, or V-Star, or Harley if you can afford it.

Having said all that, if this is your first bike, then the Rebel 250 is a great and inexpensive beginner bike that will do everything you need while learning your skills. It also will not be a financial disaster if you drop it or ding it while learning. You can also resell it in a year or so for essentially the same price that you paid for it, as long as you resist the urge to dismantle it and call it a bobber.

Good luck with your decision, and hope you find what fits you.

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