Front Brake Caliper rubbing on disc ? - Page 2 - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #11 of 32 Old 06-29-2015, 10:08 PM
 
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Yikes... I'm getting a little scared just reading your question. Fork oil does 2 things...

1. lubricates the telescopic action of the front fork suspension making it free and smooth in motion. and
2. damps the telescopic action of the forks by forcing the fluid through small orifices providing controlled rebound and shock absorption.

If you think something is loose check your steering bearings. Pull back and forth on the front axle with both hands. There should be no looseness at all in the steering head bearings. There should also be no lateral looseness between the lower fork legs and the upper part.

You should get yourself some decent tools if you want to maintain your bike. A set of combination wrenches and a set of metric sockets is a good start. You can remove the caliper using a box end wrench or a socket so as to avoid damaging the flats of the bolts. If you remove the caliper from the disk (leave the hose connected though) , you will see how the half the body of the caliper floats from side to side on the pins. Pry up the rubber boots and force some silicon grease in and around the pins under the boots. You can then work the caliper back and forth to free up the pins and work the grease all around them. When they move easily and freely you can reinstall the caliper and you should be fine. Don't forget to apply the brakes as soon as you get the caliper reinstalled because it may take several strokes of the lever to self center the caliper and take the slack out of the brake.

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1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
1968 Triumph Bonneville
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post #12 of 32 Old 06-29-2015, 11:07 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckster View Post
Yikes... I'm getting a little scared just reading your question. Fork oil does 2 things...

1. lubricates the telescopic action of the front fork suspension making it free and smooth in motion. and
2. damps the telescopic action of the forks by forcing the fluid through small orifices providing controlled rebound and shock absorption.

If you think something is loose check your steering bearings. Pull back and forth on the front axle with both hands. There should be no looseness at all in the steering head bearings. There should also be no lateral looseness between the lower fork legs and the upper part.

You should get yourself some decent tools if you want to maintain your bike. A set of combination wrenches and a set of metric sockets is a good start. You can remove the caliper using a box end wrench or a socket so as to avoid damaging the flats of the bolts. If you remove the caliper from the disk (leave the hose connected though) , you will see how the half the body of the caliper floats from side to side on the pins. Pry up the rubber boots and force some silicon grease in and around the pins under the boots. You can then work the caliper back and forth to free up the pins and work the grease all around them. When they move easily and freely you can reinstall the caliper and you should be fine. Don't forget to apply the brakes as soon as you get the caliper reinstalled because it may take several strokes of the lever to self center the caliper and take the slack out of the brake.
Thanks a lot.. I've also been told that the fork oil is supposed to prevent me from having my suspension button out.. Like where my suspension hits over really rough bumps. I think I need to add more fork oil but I'm not sure how to know how much more to add and when to stop pouring ! THANKS

1986 REBEL 450

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WORKS ENGINEERING BROOKLYN LIFER
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post #13 of 32 Old 06-29-2015, 11:14 PM
 
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To the extent that fork oil damps the compression of a fork it might help prevent bottoming, but most cheap forks don't do much compression damping. Someone more familiar with the 450 may chime in with the fork oil capacity on your bike. Put exactly that much in there. No more, No less.

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1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
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post #14 of 32 Old 06-30-2015, 02:55 AM Thread Starter
 
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To the extent that fork oil damps the compression of a fork it might help prevent bottoming, but most cheap forks don't do much compression damping. Someone more familiar with the 450 may chime in with the fork oil capacity on your bike. Put exactly that much in there. No more, No less.
What size sockets do I need to get the brake captures off ?

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I WANNA BE A CYCLE ZOMBIE IN NYC

WORKS ENGINEERING BROOKLYN LIFER
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post #15 of 32 Old 06-30-2015, 03:16 AM Thread Starter
 
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I'm going first thing tomorrow to the hardware store to get a set of metric sockets 1/4 and silicone grease for the pins..

Hoping this will help.. Probably need new pads because i don't they've never been replaced and it's an '86

THANKS !

1986 REBEL 450

I WANNA BE A CYCLE ZOMBIE IN NYC

WORKS ENGINEERING BROOKLYN LIFER
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post #16 of 32 Old 06-30-2015, 07:51 AM
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You really need to invest in a service manual. It will pay for itself the first time you use it. You need to remove the caliper to get to the pins. You don't "cover them in grease", just put a light coating of silicone grease on the pins only. Auto parts stores sell silicone brake grease in little packets. You will only need a dab of grease from the packet, not the whole thing. If the pins are rusty, sand lightly to remove the rust, and make sure all the rust and sandpaper abrasive are off the pins/caliper before applying the grease. When putting it back together, the bolts need to be snug, not super tight.

Keepin' all the left over parts. Gonna use 'em to build another bike!

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post #17 of 32 Old 06-30-2015, 08:05 AM
 
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Originally Posted by dancarter View Post
I'm going first thing tomorrow to the hardware store to get a set of metric sockets 1/4 and silicone grease for the pins..

Hoping this will help.. Probably need new pads because i don't they've never been replaced and it's an '86

THANKS !
If you are referring to 1/4 DRIVE size socket set, you might want to reconsider. 3/8 drive will be much more appropriate for most maintenance tasks. The sets from SEARS are reasonably priced and warranted for life.

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post #18 of 32 Old 06-30-2015, 10:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by dancarter View Post
What size sockets do I need to get the brake captures off ?
Buy a SET of 3/8 drive sockets and a rachet handle. That will cover you for most of the common sizes on a Rebel. you will need larger wrenches for some things, but the basic 3/8 drive set is a good start.

As a complete newbie, you should also have a shop manual as noted by others, as well as a 3/8 drive TORQUE WRENCH to avoid stripping out threads in your engine. New mechanics tend to over tighten everything and destroy the soft aluminum threads in the engine cases.

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1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
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post #19 of 32 Old 06-30-2015, 06:28 PM Thread Starter
 
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Ok I finally found a tube of silicone grease. Permatex Tune Up Grase...

Unscrewed the caliper, popped out the pins, greased them up a lot, and then slid them right back in and they were nice and greased up. Hopefully this will help my issue. I rode a lot today already and am beat, but will go for a quick ride tonight to see if this fixed my rubbing issue. I imagine it will because the pins were dry almost sticks so they were moving anywhere...

Thanks everyone for the help. Got a set of socket wrenches Metric and US for 13 bucks and spent 5 on the grease. ( 1/2 size socket with 1/4 adapter for the smaller sockets !)

So for 20 bucks I not did the job myself, but hopefully solved this squeaky problem !

THANK YOU THANK YOU

1986 REBEL 450

I WANNA BE A CYCLE ZOMBIE IN NYC

WORKS ENGINEERING BROOKLYN LIFER
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post #20 of 32 Old 06-30-2015, 08:01 PM
 
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Good stuff! You solved a problem, have some tools and have some experience... Pretty good deal for 20 bucks..
You won't need the SAE size sockets (US) for any fastenings on the Rebel

2004 Rebel 250, 2003 BMW K1200GT (roadburner), 2004 BMW R1200GS(all purpose),
1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
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