New Rider from Lynchburg Virginia - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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New Rider from Lynchburg Virginia

Hello everyone. My name is Godfrey. Am from Virginia. Am originally from Kenya. Never owned a motorcycle before. I am an OTR so i love the roads. Just picked up a 2016 Honda Rebel 250 with only 257 Miles on it for $2250. Bike is basically brand New. Just need afew tips to maintain her well and possibly a tip on how to find local riders near me. Thanks
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post #2 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 03:47 PM
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Welcome to the forum. The best way to learn the basics of operating a motorcycle on the street is to take a basic rider course such as those offered in every state by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation.

Is the engine running well? If it isn't, usually the carb needs cleaning due to storing it without first draining gas from the carb.

Most members here change the oil every 1,000 to 1,500 miles rather than the 4,000 mile interval recommends in the owners manual. It doesn't have an oil filter, and being an aircooled engine, frequent oil changes are best for extending engine life. It only takes 1.6 quarts of oil to refill the engine after draining the old oil. The oil level is checked with the bike level (not on the sidestand), and the dipstick unscrewed and just resting on the threads. Be sure to use motor oil that does not contain friction modifiers as they will cause the clutch to slip. You are usually safe with 10W or 15W-40 oils.

Keepin' all the left over parts. Gonna use 'em to build another bike!

'01 & '09 Rebel 250, '06 Ninja 250, '89 VN 750
Putting your bike year and model in your signature helps others help you!
Here's how: https://www.hondarebelforum.com/f19/...re-121087.html
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post #3 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 04:17 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by flitecontrol View Post
Welcome to the forum. The best way to learn the basics of operating a motorcycle on the street is to take a basic rider course such as those offered in every state by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation.

Is the engine running well? If it isn't, usually the carb needs cleaning due to storing it without first draining gas from the carb.

Most members here change the oil every 1,000 to 1,500 miles rather than the 4,000 mile interval recommends in the owners manual. It doesn't have an oil filter, and being an aircooled engine, frequent oil changes are best for extending engine life. It only takes 1.6 quarts of oil to refill the engine after draining the old oil. The oil level is checked with the bike level (not on the sidestand), and the dipstick unscrewed and just resting on the threads. Be sure to use motor oil that does not contain friction modifiers as they will cause the clutch to slip. You are usually safe with 10W or 15W-40 oils.
Thank you for afew tips. Yes. I am planning to take the bike course at my local community college when the weather gets better. The engine seems to run fine but am planning to run seafoarm in it just to make sure. Whats the best oil brand to use? I know you mentioned about friction and clutch. Can regular auto oil in Walmart work? Or has to be small engine specific oil? Thanks
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post #4 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 05:45 PM
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All of the XXW-30 automotive oils have friction modifiers, so don't use them. I use Shell Rotella 15W-40 because that's what I use in my tractor. Any oil that is JASO rated will not have friction modifiers. Motorcycle specific oils are suitable, but they tend to be much more expensive, and are no better than other oils.

SeaFoam probably isn't going to help anything, in spite of its advertising. If the engine runs well, just use regular 89 octane in it, and keep the tank topped off to minimize the formation of condensation in the tank. Condensation will collect at the bottom of the tank and cause rust, which should be avoided. Using ethanol gasoline will help absorb any condensation that may develop. It's a good habit to turn the fuel petcock (valve) to the OFF position to avoid contaminating the oil with gasoline in the event the carb float valve leaks. If your Rebel will sit unridden for more than a few months, drain the fuel from the carb. I also recommend you install an inline fuel filter to ensure any contaminants in the fuel or tank don't reach the carb. https://www.hondarebelforum.com/f39/...ter-13278.html

If you haven't found it yet, there are quite a few "How to" threads in the Wrenching section of the forum. As you have the time, I would suggest you look them over.
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Keepin' all the left over parts. Gonna use 'em to build another bike!

'01 & '09 Rebel 250, '06 Ninja 250, '89 VN 750
Putting your bike year and model in your signature helps others help you!
Here's how: https://www.hondarebelforum.com/f19/...re-121087.html
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post #5 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 06:25 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by flitecontrol View Post
All of the XXW-30 automotive oils have friction modifiers, so don't use them. I use Shell Rotella 15W-40 because that's what I use in my tractor. Any oil that is JASO rated will not have friction modifiers. Motorcycle specific oils are suitable, but they tend to be much more expensive, and are no better than other oils.

SeaFoam probably isn't going to help anything, in spite of its advertising. If the engine runs well, just use regular 89 octane in it, and keep the tank topped off to minimize the formation of condensation in the tank. Condensation will collect at the bottom of the tank and cause rust, which should be avoided. Using ethanol gasoline will help absorb any condensation that may develop. It's a good habit to turn the fuel petcock (valve) to the OFF position to avoid contaminating the oil with gasoline in the event the carb float valve leaks. If your Rebel will sit unridden for more than a few months, drain the fuel from the carb. I also recommend you install an inline fuel filter to ensure any contaminants in the fuel or tank don't reach the carb. https://www.hondarebelforum.com/f39/...ter-13278.html

If you haven't found it yet, there are quite a few "How to" threads in the Wrenching section of the forum. As you have the time, I would suggest you look them over.
Sounds good. Thanks for the helpful information.
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post #6 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 08:39 PM
 
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Welcome Kabusheke2004. The MSF course is a must. You might also enjoy a book by David L. Hough titled "Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well." There are used copies on ebay that are quite resonable. I think that you will find the book is a very valuable companion to the MSF course and the guidance available on the forum. Enjoy your Rebel!

1986 Honda Rebel 250cc
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post #7 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 10:51 PM
 
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Welcome. You got a good deal. I bought a brand new 2016 Rebel from a dealer, and got it OTD for $3495. I'm not a beginner, been riding for 44 years. I just love Rebels (the old school air cooled ones) and have had four.

I definitely recommend taking the MSF course, it will be the best money you ever spent. When I started riding on the street in the mid '70s, there was no MSF course (I took it many years later) but it was also a LOT less dangerous than it is today. Dumb drivers (which is most of them), distracted drivers (which is most of them) and drivers in a hurry to get nowhere fast (which is all of them) and a drastic increase in the amount of traffic on the roads has combined to make riding several times more dangerous than it used to be. After taking the MSF course and getting a good helmet, riding with the right attitude will likely do you more good than anything else. I personally don't believe the commonly held notion that all riders will eventually crash. After 44 years and close to a million miles of riding I have yet to crash on the street. And I am by no means alone. A lot of crashes are the same riders crashing over and over again. I have heard a lot of riders (yes, mostly sport bike riders) actually bragging about how many crashes they have survived. Must not be very good riders. But I do admit the odds are against you in todays world.


As for the bike, if it runs well, just keep it maintained by the book, except for changing the oil every 1000 miles. If you are going to let it sit for a prolonged time, definitely drain the tank and carb. Todays ethanol gas can do serious damage if left in there too long.


With a solo rider, the Rebel can handle highway riding. I weigh 240 pounds and have put around 30,000 highway miles on Rebel 250s. They will run forever at full throttle (well, almost) The biggest issue I've had with riding long distance on a Rebel is the extremely cramped riding position. I'm big, and don't fit very well. I got forward controls, and they help a lot. Some padding on the seat also helps. But you will definitely give out before the bike.
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post #8 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 11:07 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Nardospark View Post
Welcome Kabusheke2004. The MSF course is a must. You might also enjoy a book by David L. Hough titled "Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well." There are used copies on ebay that are quite resonable. I think that you will find the book is a very valuable companion to the MSF course and the guidance available on the forum. Enjoy your Rebel!
Thank you for your welcome. Am excited to be part of this group. Am getting some good tips already.
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post #9 of 13 Old 01-20-2019, 11:12 PM Thread Starter
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Welcome. You got a good deal. I bought a brand new 2016 Rebel from a dealer, and got it OTD for $3495. I'm not a beginner, been riding for 44 years. I just love Rebels (the old school air cooled ones) and have had four.

I definitely recommend taking the MSF course, it will be the best money you ever spent. When I started riding on the street in the mid '70s, there was no MSF course (I took it many years later) but it was also a LOT less dangerous than it is today. Dumb drivers (which is most of them), distracted drivers (which is most of them) and drivers in a hurry to get nowhere fast (which is all of them) and a drastic increase in the amount of traffic on the roads has combined to make riding several times more dangerous than it used to be. After taking the MSF course and getting a good helmet, riding with the right attitude will likely do you more good than anything else. I personally don't believe the commonly held notion that all riders will eventually crash. After 44 years and close to a million miles of riding I have yet to crash on the street. And I am by no means alone. A lot of crashes are the same riders crashing over and over again. I have heard a lot of riders (yes, mostly sport bike riders) actually bragging about how many crashes they have survived. Must not be very good riders. But I do admit the odds are against you in todays world.


As for the bike, if it runs well, just keep it maintained by the book, except for changing the oil every 1000 miles. If you are going to let it sit for a prolonged time, definitely drain the tank and carb. Todays ethanol gas can do serious damage if left in there too long.


With a solo rider, the Rebel can handle highway riding. I weigh 240 pounds and have put around 30,000 highway miles on Rebel 250s. They will run forever at full throttle (well, almost) The biggest issue I've had with riding long distance on a Rebel is the extremely cramped riding position. I'm big, and don't fit very well. I got forward controls, and they help a lot. Some padding on the seat also helps. But you will definitely give out before the bike.
Thank you JERRY​ for taking your time to welcome me and giving me afew tips. I will definitely do the course as opposed to just reading the DMV book. Plus i will dig in to more forums in here. So much helpful information here. Am planning to change the oil sooner as most have recommended at 1000 miles due to fact the bike has no oil filter. I rode it alil bit and its fun. Looking forward to summer. Be safe out there
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post #10 of 13 Old 01-21-2019, 08:22 AM
 
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Welcome @Kabusheke2004
The first oil change should take palce at about 700 miles (you said it has 257 now).

As @flitecontrol said, only use oil that has JASO-MA or JASO-MA2 or JASO-MA/MA2 listed on the label, that means it won't ruin your motorcycle's wet clutch.
If it doesn't have any writing on the label that says it is JASO then stay away from it.

2009 Honda Rebel 250; 2009 Honda Shadow 750 Spirit
"The bravest thing for me to do is admit when I am wrong" - unknown
HRF Answer #1 You should take the MSF Rider Course
HRF Answer #2 You need to clean your carburetor
HRF Answer #3 Sorry we assumed if you didn't say otherwise
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