First Bobber Build - Page 11 - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #101 of 114 Old 06-04-2017, 10:18 PM Thread Starter
 
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Hey all, I finally finished painting my gas tank! And I decided to take the plunge and make a set of custom pipes that were stewing in my mind for a while.

This is what i started with. I got the pipe from my local muffler shop and got them to do the bends too. Also got a 50 foot roll of exhaust wrap from ebay.



Made some baffles to keep it somewhat quieter, and for some needed back pressure.



Found this interesting piece of engineering... Why in the world would they need 5 layers of metal? I guess it really takes that much insulation to get it so quiet stock.



Tacked up...



Then of course I was so into it that I forgot to take any more pics until it was done and I was home. Durp. Anyway, here it is. Oh and I got some new grips.









Thanks for looking,
Cheers!

.
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post #102 of 114 Old 06-05-2017, 09:41 AM
 
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Nice tube-work! The bike is coming along great.
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"Ride Safe, Chop Safer" Motorcycles are not unsafe. However; they are extremely unforgiving of inattention, incompetence, ignorance, and stupidity.
Dismantling, sawzalling, and rattle canning does not make a bobber.
Those are STEPS toward customizing, not customizing unto itself.
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post #103 of 114 Old 06-05-2017, 09:17 PM
 
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Very impressive paint job. Fantastic
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post #104 of 114 Old 06-05-2017, 10:49 PM Thread Starter
 
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Nice tube-work! The bike is coming along great.
Thanks Shack! I really had to hobble it together with with some random O'reilly exhaust reducers and at the end some pieces of thick conduit pipe to get the id close to the random 1 3/8 stock od. Im actually surprised it worked haha.
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post #105 of 114 Old 06-05-2017, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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Very impressive paint job. Fantastic
Thanks Jason! Its all rattle can so it took forever to fully dry between coats. I was still impatient and there are some pretty big mistakes, im kinda bummed but I couldn't be bothered to start over. Thankfully they're hard to see from far.
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post #106 of 114 Old 06-06-2017, 06:11 PM Thread Starter
 
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Brought my camera with me today to get some good pics during lunch. I think I'm pretty much done now, I also just picked up an '84 K100RS, so now I have a new Cafe project to waste all my time and money on...











Thanks for looking,
Cheers!
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post #107 of 114 Old 06-06-2017, 06:45 PM
 
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Having ridden nearly 100,000 miles on An 85 K100, I came to see it as one of the best motorcycles of all time. I would suggest you might want to make minimal if any changes to an outstanding stock motorcycle. It was AFAIK the first fuel injected mass production motorcycle ever. It has super-hard nicasil plasma lined cylinder bores and cast iron rings that just don't wear out. During the 16 years I owned it, It had ZERO issues with the fuel system. It always idled at precisely 800 RPM. It has an ALUMINUM fuel tank that is as bright and shiny inside after 30 years as it was brand new. The engine is affectionately called "the aluminum brick" because of its unusual rectangular layout and it's bulletproof reputation for reliability. 200,000 miles or more is normal on these bikes.
I have seen the STAINTUNE aftermarket mufflers fitted but really no other successful modifications .
I did a lot of mechanical work on mine to maintain systems and ultimately to replace a transmission bearing. I was always impressed by the engineering and build quality of this bike that made it easy to work on, and easy to put back together oil tight.
I now have a 2003 K1200 GT which is the final stage of development of the "brick" engine at 130 HP compared to 90 for the original 983 CC engine.
I'd strongly suggest that you ride the thing in stock form at least for a while before trying to "customize" it. It's an outstanding piece of work just as it is and one of the few '80s bikes that are still relevant today IMO.
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post #108 of 114 Old 06-06-2017, 07:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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Having ridden nearly 100,000 miles on An 85 K100, I came to see it as one of the best motorcycles of all time. I would suggest you might want to make minimal if any changes to an outstanding stock motorcycle. It was AFAIK the first fuel injected mass production motorcycle ever. It has super-hard nicasil plasma lined cylinder bores and cast iron rings that just don't wear out. During the 16 years I owned it, It had ZERO issues with the fuel system. It always idled at precisely 800 RPM. It has an ALUMINUM fuel tank that is as bright and shiny inside after 30 years as it was brand new. The engine is affectionately called "the aluminum brick" because of its unusual rectangular layout and it's bulletproof reputation for reliability. 200,000 miles or more is normal on these bikes.
I have seen the STAINTUNE aftermarket mufflers fitted but really no other successful modifications .
I did a lot of mechanical work on mine to maintain systems and ultimately to replace a transmission bearing. I was always impressed by the engineering and build quality of this bike that made it easy to work on, and easy to put back together oil tight.
I now have a 2003 K1200 GT which is the final stage of development of the "brick" engine at 130 HP compared to 90 for the original 983 CC engine.
I'd strongly suggest that you ride the thing in stock form at least for a while before trying to "customize" it. It's an outstanding piece of work just as it is and one of the few '80s bikes that are still relevant today IMO.
Thanks for the advice Duckster! I have read a lot about how bulletproof and reliable the flying bricks are and for that reason I have no intention of re engineering the wheel. Unfortunately (or fortunately for my wallet) It was dropped a few times and has some nasty cosmetic issues like cracked fenders, broken turn signals, ripped seat and missing side panels, rusty bolts and some corrosion on the frame. But like you said, inside the gas tank looks shiny and brand new, and it fires right up every time and idles like a well engineered German machine should. So mechanically I will try and restore it to factory specs as much as i can, but that being said I cant stand the boxyness of the 80's design so my plan is to only add a nice cafe front fairing and seat. Ive already photoshoped some ideas. Curious what you think.
Cheers,
-J



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post #109 of 114 Old 06-06-2017, 11:22 PM
 
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I suspect the brick under the sidestand is due to the fact that the center stand has been removed. This is a bad idea on these bikes for a couple of reasons.
The obvious one is the difficulty in removing the rear wheel without it. Its impossible to use a swingarm stand, and the bike is difficult to jack without steadying the front end.

The second problem is due to one of the quirks of these early K bikes. The bike must be parked on the center stand always because if left leaning on the sidestand, oil will run into the cylinders past the rings and result in a cloud of blue smoke when the engine is started. This is quite embarrassing, but apparently does no real harm, and the smoke clears after a minute or so. My engine never used any significant amount of oil. I suspect that's why the guy parked it on a brick so the bike is more vertical. That's cool as long as no one bumps into it or a gust of wind hits it and knocks it over from that precarious vertical position.

If the bike is rough to begin with, the cafe look of this bike is probably OK if you like the look. I would definitely want to fit a hugger (rear fender) to cover that rear wheel to keep road debris and water from being blasted forward and up onto the battery, ECU and sensitive electronics etc. This will protect the bike as much as the rider. The stock bike has the rear wheel well shielded from the rest of the bike.

Racing seats are notoriously uncomfortable and that one looks like a plank. Perhaps that is the nature of the beast, and as long as you don't plan any long rides it may be OK. These bikes thrive on long fast runs though.
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post #110 of 114 Old 06-08-2017, 06:55 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckster View Post
I suspect the brick under the sidestand is due to the fact that the center stand has been removed. This is a bad idea on these bikes for a couple of reasons.
The obvious one is the difficulty in removing the rear wheel without it. Its impossible to use a swingarm stand, and the bike is difficult to jack without steadying the front end.

The second problem is due to one of the quirks of these early K bikes. The bike must be parked on the center stand always because if left leaning on the sidestand, oil will run into the cylinders past the rings and result in a cloud of blue smoke when the engine is started. This is quite embarrassing, but apparently does no real harm, and the smoke clears after a minute or so. My engine never used any significant amount of oil. I suspect that's why the guy parked it on a brick so the bike is more vertical. That's cool as long as no one bumps into it or a gust of wind hits it and knocks it over from that precarious vertical position.

If the bike is rough to begin with, the cafe look of this bike is probably OK if you like the look. I would definitely want to fit a hugger (rear fender) to cover that rear wheel to keep road debris and water from being blasted forward and up onto the battery, ECU and sensitive electronics etc. This will protect the bike as much as the rider. The stock bike has the rear wheel well shielded from the rest of the bike.

Racing seats are notoriously uncomfortable and that one looks like a plank. Perhaps that is the nature of the beast, and as long as you don't plan any long rides it may be OK. These bikes thrive on long fast runs though.
Duckster, thanks for the kind and informative response, but i have to apologize for a misunderstanding. Above is not my k100rs, just a good clean side shot of one i found online so i could do some photoshoping. I understand about the oiling system and I will definitely be keeping the center stand to keep everything nice and level. Also I will be keeping or making a rear hugger for the exact reasons you mentioned. The last think i want to do is dish out a grand for a new l-jetronic unit. (if you look closely the pic above does actually have a hugger)... My big issue will be the seat, as i definitely would like to be comfortable for nice long cruises, but I have to admit Im a sucker for extremely clean lines so i will have to find a middle ground on that. Below is my actual bike, and also the pretty side without the cracks and scratches. As you can see it definitely is rough, so I am inclined to think that the best course of action is a mild custom cafe. I ultimately would love an air cooled BMW so this is a project i hope to flip considering I got the bike for free for trailering my friends barn find Vincent Black Shadow a few hundred miles... Talk about bike goals! Anyway thanks again for the advice and hopefully soon ill get on one of the k100 forums. Which are you on and whats your username? Thanks in advance.
Cheers!
-Jasper

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