Newbie - Need New Tires - Help? - Page 2 - Honda Rebel Forum
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post #11 of 25 Old 02-07-2017, 07:37 PM
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You will be ok new tyres are softer than old ones and will grip better than your old ones after a few miles



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post #12 of 25 Old 02-07-2017, 09:41 PM
 
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New tires can be slick mostly due to release agents used by manufactures.. Not nearly as bad as years past
yet softer as wjmrty states, you may need to ride a few miles being careful in your leaning..

I ride a dirt road just getting to pavement, It dirties up sticky/slippery tires fast
You can see your lean angle after a few miles by looking at tire scuffing along the tread edges

New tires are said to be in need of being broken in
It is suggested to ride at ever increasing speed to heat up tires. 20 to 30 minuets minimum.. I do it..
google "motorcycle tire break in"

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post #13 of 25 Old 02-07-2017, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoakedKarma View Post
New tires can be slick mostly due to release agents used by manufactures.. Not nearly as bad as years past
yet softer as wjmrty states, you may need to ride a few miles being careful in your leaning..

I ride a dirt road just getting to pavement, It dirties up sticky/slippery tires fast
You can see your lean angle after a few miles by looking at tire scuffing along the tread edges

New tires are said to be in need of being broken in
It is suggested to ride at ever increasing speed to heat up tires. 20 to 30 minuets minimum.. I do it..
google "motorcycle tire break in"
okay thank you. i saw it says 100mi is recommended for breaking them in. i'm just nervous about leaning. i suck at leaning to begin with. so i don't lean too much. haven't ridden but maybe 200mi total in my life.

1996 Rebel CMX250C
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post #14 of 25 Old 02-07-2017, 10:35 PM
 
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Actually its the bike that does the leaning.. You just need to sit straight up and down and push on the handlebars as you turn.
Limiting the bikes lean angle will limit your cornering speed because speed and lean angle are necessarily related. If you start out with small lean angles you will gradually wear in the center part of the tire. Gradually increase your cornering speed and lean angle so you expand the cleaned outer edges of the wear surface a little at a time.
Years ago I went to a track school that taught me that my bike and my tires could lean over much farther and go much faster around corners than I had previously been comfortable with. As you gain experience you will find that trusting your tires and cornering quickly is one of the best things about riding a motorcycle.

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1996 Ducati 900SS CR (California Bike), 1973 Norton Interstate (in a box in the basement)
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post #15 of 25 Old 02-08-2017, 09:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by eekmamba View Post
okay thank you. i saw it says 100mi is recommended for breaking them in. i'm just nervous about leaning. i suck at leaning to begin with. so i don't lean too much. haven't ridden but maybe 200mi total in my life.
Don't feel bad, I passed the course some months ago and for a while I still had trouble getting it to click, I felt like I was forcing it and not at all like the comfortable way it felt like on my bicycle.
What helped me finally sort it out mentally was low speed swerving side to side on an empty neighborhood street. by myself, no cones, no pressure, just fast enough to stay upright balanced comfortably and no faster, weaving side to side.

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post #16 of 25 Old 02-09-2017, 12:06 AM Thread Starter
 
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Don't feel bad, I passed the course some months ago and for a while I still had trouble getting it to click, I felt like I was forcing it and not at all like the comfortable way it felt like on my bicycle.
What helped me finally sort it out mentally was low speed swerving side to side on an empty neighborhood street. by myself, no cones, no pressure, just fast enough to stay upright balanced comfortably and no faster, weaving side to side.
thank you very much. that's reassuring. i will have to try that in a parking lot nearby.

1996 Rebel CMX250C
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post #17 of 25 Old 02-09-2017, 04:36 AM
 
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You can safely drag the pegs on a Rebel, but remember it is not a sport bike. Start slow and take your time. Leaning way over can be a bit unnerving until you get used to it and realize it is not going down. Take curves slow at first. Brake before entering the curve. As you enter the curve, put slight pressure on the bars away from the curve (in a left curve, put a slight amount of forward pressure on the left grip, and rearward pressure on the right grip. The bike will fall into the turn perfectly once you get some practice. Lean with the bike. Use the throttle coming out of the curve. Many new riders are so afraid of leaning over that they straighten up in a curve and run right off the road. Be careful not to become disoriented. That happened to me when I was first learning to fly. It can happen when what you see and what you feel don't match. It should go away when you get used to it.
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post #18 of 25 Old 02-09-2017, 08:21 AM
 
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The idea of scraping the pegs still scares me a bit. I know pegs are designed to fold up in case you do scrape them so that the weight stays on the tires, but I've been treated to a lot of youtube "suggested" videos where the peg didn't fold up and low-sided the bike instead...

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post #19 of 25 Old 02-09-2017, 08:25 AM
 
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Just to add to what Jerry said. Push forward on the handlebar on the side you wish to turn toward. Relax the other arm on the outside of the turn. Keep your eyes level to avoid any disorientation and look up and scanning as far around the corner as you can . As a newbie you should not move your body at all . Remain seated in a straight up and down position in a relaxed position. The bike will do the leaning, and you will just go with it. Your hands and head are the only things that need to move at all. Keep your eyes scanning as far around the corner as you can see, both to spot hazards and also to maintain your cornering line. You will go where your eyes are looking. Beginners often get disoriented and scare themselves when they allow their eyes to drop to the road close to the bike or when they look at guard rails or telephone poles at the side of the road

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post #20 of 25 Old 02-09-2017, 01:58 PM
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Just to add to what has already been stated, just push the handlebar, and let the bike take care of the leaning. Just don't fight it, and it will do the right thing, in spite of whatever you think it should do. Look as far down the road or around the curve as you can see, and steer the bike. It will do the rest, and if you just go with the flow, you will lean with it whether you realize it or not.

Look where you want to go, and you will go where you look. But that also implies, that if you look at the ditch or the danger, you will run into the ditch or into the danger, every time.

Regarding scraping the pegs, forget about it as it is just a mental distraction. You will never get there until you are aggressively and intentionally overdriving the curves. The Rebel pegs do fold up to a degree, and let you know when they begin to scrape if you ever get to that point. This gives you some warning that you are pushing the limit. If you intentionally push the limit past the warning, or find yourself in a situation you misjudged, and have to scrape the peg in order to get out of it, the peg will eventually run out of fold up room, or hit the passenger pegs, and lift the rear tire when it becomes a pivot. I have experienced this many times on many different bikes while aggressively riding the twisties like the Tail of The Dragon. It is a bit disconcerting the first time you experience it, and can easily cause you to wreck if you panic. However if you have given yourself room between you and the edge of the road, the result is that the rear of the bike will jump sideways a couple of feet and give you a much better angle to negotiate the curve from. It allows you to complete the curve with less lean than you originally needed, as long as you are prepared, don't panic, and continue to ride your bike around the corner and out of danger. Then you can stop and throw away your underwear.

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